Amal Clooney to co-chair Met Gala

Amal Clooney
Updated 09 November 2017
0

Amal Clooney to co-chair Met Gala

NEW YORK: It is the most sought after invitation in the celebrity universe — and on Wednesday, Amal Clooney, Rihanna and Donatella Versace were named co-chairs of next year’s glittering Met Gala in New York.
Held every year on the first Monday in May, the black-tie extravaganza is the chief source of income for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, reportedly raising more than $13 million in 2016.
Tickets are said to cost $30,000 each or $275,000 for a table, ruling out all but the most elite coterie of A-list Hollywood actors, best-selling music superstars, top models and fashion designers.
Clooney — the 39-year-old British-Lebanese wife of Hollywood heartthrob George and new mother of twins — is feted as much for her fashion sense as her work as an international human rights lawyer.
Rihanna, 29, needs no introduction as one of the biggest pop stars on the planet, also lauded for her bold style, and Versace is the 62-year-old legendary Italian designer and sister of Gianni, who was murdered in Miami in 1997.
Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour — who has singlehandedly transformed the ball into the hottest ticket in town — is also co-chair of the event, which will be held on May 7.
But there is one person definitely not invited. Wintour told “Late Late Show” host James Corden last month that she would never invite back Donald Trump — who has attended with wife Melania in the past, before he was elected US president.
Wintour was a prominent Hillary Clinton fundraiser.
The theme is “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,” which the Museum also announced is the title of next year’s exhibition at The Costume Institute.
The exhibition, which will open May 10, will feature papal robes and accessories flown from the Vatican that will serve as the “cornerstone” and showcase the influence of liturgical vestments on designers, the museum said.
Designers in the exhibition will include Balenciaga, Chanel, Givenchy, Karl Lagerfeld, the Versaces and Vivienne Westwood.


Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

In this photo taken on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, and released by Intan Syari, Indonesian Intan Syari poses in her wedding dress with a bouquet of flowers on the day of her planned wedding in Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia. (AP)
Updated 16 November 2018
0

Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

  • Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations

JAKARTA, Indonesia: An Indonesian woman whose fiance died on a Lion Air flight that plunged into the sea was photographed in her wedding dress and professed her love for him on the day they were to have been married.
Intan Syari’s fiance, Dr. Rio Nanda Pratama, was among 189 people who were killed when the Boeing 737 crashed Oct. 29 shortly after taking off from Jakarta.
Syari and Pratama, both 26, had planned to get married Sunday. Pratama, who had attended a seminar in Jakarta, was on his way home to Pangkal Pinang for the wedding.
Syari said Pratama had joked before leaving that if he was late in returning, Syari should take photos in her wedding gown and send them to him.
“We were just joking at that time,” Syari told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “He asked me to still wear my wedding gown that he chose for me on our wedding day, put on beautiful makeup and hold a white rose bouquet, take good photos and send them to him.”
She said Pratama was her “first love” and they started dating 13 years ago.
On Sunday, she went ahead and took photos in the white wedding gown with a white satin head covering and a white rose bouquet in her hand, surrounded by relatives and friends.
“Although I actually feel grief that I cannot describe, I have to smile for you,” Syari wrote on Instagram. “I should not be sad, I have to stay strong as you always say to me, I love you, Rio Nanda Pratama.”
Investigators say sensors that help prevent planes from stalling were replaced on the Lion Air plane the day before its fatal flight and may have compounded other problems with the aircraft.
Body parts are still being recovered and searchers are continuing to hunt for the cockpit voice recorder.
Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations.