Saudi Archaeology Forum calls for involving scholarship students in archaeological work

Participants share ideas at the first Saudi Antiquities Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday. (Photo by Ahmed Fathi)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Saudi Archaeology Forum calls for involving scholarship students in archaeological work

RIYADH: Saudi scholarship students at the first Saudi Archaeology Forum have said that involving them in archaeological work and enacting legislation to preserve the national heritage were key issues.
Cooperation between the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), the Ministry of Education and universities was the best way to achieve this, they said during a workshop on the second day of the forum.
Other recommendations from the workshop included a partnership between the SCTH, the Ministry of Education and universities to determine the needs of archaeology; sending scholarship students to study technical specialties such as painting, surveying and photography; and the formation of a higher committee to determine scientific needs in archaeology.
Khalid Fayez Al-Asmari, a Ph.D. student in Britain, called for finding ways to overcome the obstacles faced by scholarship students, notably language. He also called for “partnerships with foreign universities to develop programs of archaeology in the Kingdom and expand students’ perceptions and opportunities.”
Mesfir Hamad Al-Qahtani, a Master’s degree student in the US, said that language is also one of the main obstacles for archaeology scholarship students, as well as the lack of guidance for important disciplines.
Fahda Salman bin Afizan, a Ph.D. student in France, stressed that funding and language were among the most important obstacles she faced. “However, we are able to overcome these obstacles because of the importance of studying abroad and what it can add either through comprehensive preparation for study or qualification.”
She called for “the establishment of a higher education committee comprising the SCTH and specialized universities to organize the process of scholarship and identify the needs of the archaeological sector in the Kingdom.”
The workshop included experiences of Saudi students in the study of archaeology in scholarship countries; the development of scholarships programs for archaeology; and the development of relationships between Saudi universities, the scholarship agency and the SCTH to develop the path of research in archaeology.
Faisal Al-Fadhel, a member of the Shoura Council, called for all necessary protection for the Kingdom’s antiquities. He explained that this could be done through the identification of violations and penalties appropriate to these.
“The SCTH and judicial bodies will implement this according to competence, in addition to obligating the violator to repair the damage he causes, while ensuring his right to object to the decision or sentence issued against him,” Al-Fadhel said.


KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian financial and logistical support in Yemen. AFP
Updated 17 July 2018
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KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

  • There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians
  • The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million

JEDDAH: King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) has launched a project to provide Yemeni students and schools with supplies to ensure that education continues across the country despite the brutal acts of militants. The trucks started to carrying the aid from Riyadh to Yemen on Monday.

“It is a project to provide Yemen’s schools with the essential needs to ensure a better and smoother educational environment, such as chairs, desks, and boards, in addition to students’ supplies. It will support nearly 5,000 students across Yemen,” said Dr. Samer Aljetaily, spokesman for KSRelief.
“The trucks will arrive first in Ma’arib, then it will be distributed to the most needed areas across the country’s schools and students.”
“My Education” is one of the big projects given to support Yemen’s people in health, shelter, infrastructure, environment and education to help the country stand on its feet regardless of any devastation caused by the militants.
“The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million. In terms of education, the center has given financial aid to schools, paid teachers’ salaries, and provided students’ essential school needs and meals. We will continue supporting our brothers and sisters in Yemen in all sectors.”
This project has been supported by the Saudi Ministry of Education and the Saudi-led Islamic Military Coalition. “The coalition always supports our all initiatives in the interest of Yemeni citizens. The coalition will protect the aid till it arrives in Ma’arib, then it will support logistically to facilitate the distribution of the supplies. Education is a priority for the Saudi government and for KSRelief.
“We have always supported education in Yemen and always will, whether it is for schools, educational institutions, students, teachers, or even educational curricular and psychological support departments to help students become better amid all the horrific acts caused by the Houthis. KSRelief is very keen on building a strong future with a well-educated generation of Yemenis.”
Asked whether there is a lack of international support for Yemen, he told Arab News: “Saudi Arabia, along with the UAE, has attracted global attention to Yemen’s humanitarian status in different ways, including direct funding for the infrastructure of the country and huge support for health, education and the environment. Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian, financial and logistical support in Yemen. This has encouraged other countries’ support as well.
“The UAE has greatly supported the Yemen humanitarian file with $1 billion. The international community has reacted to this.
“However, there must be more international collaboration to reduce the militants’ attacks on the aid and supplies and facilitate the entry of aid and ensure a higher level of safety. There is also need for better cooperation to protect students and children in the militants’ controlled areas,” he emphasized.
“The Saudi Ministry of Education has supported this initiative by providing school supplies and students’ essential supplies.”
There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians.