Stray cat a suspect in Japan attempted murder

Above, a stray cat in Japan. Police turned their attention to the stray cats loitering around Mayuko Matsumoto’s house after realizing her wounds were caused by the feral felines, and found traces of what may be human blood on one of them. (AP)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Stray cat a suspect in Japan attempted murder

TOKYO: A Japanese police probe into the attempted murder of an elderly bedridden woman has reportedly led to an unlikely suspect: a stray cat.
Mayuko Matsumoto’s daughter found her bleeding profusely from about 20 cuts to her face on Monday at her home in a mountainous region of southern Japan.
Police launched an attempted murder investigation after seeing the wounds, some of them relatively severe, according to local broadcaster RKK.
“When we found her, blood covered everything above her chin. Her face was soaked in blood. I didn’t know what had happened,” Matsumoto’s daughter told RKK.
Matsumoto, who is 82 years old and reportedly unable to speak, had to receive emergency care, Kyodo News said.
Investigators found no sign of people entering or leaving the house at the time of the suspected attack, the private network NTV said.
They then realized that Matsumoto’s wounds looked like cat scratches, it added.
Police turned their attention to the stray cats loitering around Matsumoto’s house, and found traces of what may be human blood on one of them, the Nishinippon Shimbun newspaper said Friday.
“Police are analizing a blood sample taken from the claw of the cat which might have scratched the victim,” national broadcaster NHK reported.
A police spokesman declined to directly comment on the case on Friday, but said that investigators were not disputing the media reports.


Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

Dr. Bumbum. (Courtesy: Facebook)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

  • She was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died
  • Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out

RIO DE JANEIRO: A Brazilian celebrity butt-enhancement surgeon called Dr. Bumbum has gone on the run following the death of a patient just hours after undergoing cosmetic surgery at his home in Rio de Janeiro.
Denis Furtado was considered capable of performing magic on women’s bodies, in particular their bottoms, and became known throughout the country for his expertise.
The 45-year-old’s Instagram account reflects his popularity with 650,000 followers.
But now he is wanted by police after Lilian Quezia Calixto died just hours after a butt enlargement procedure at his home in the swanky Barra de Tijuca neighborhood.
Calixto had traveled 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) from her home in Cuiaba to see the surgeon to the stars.
But following the controversial injection of acrylic glass filler, Calixto started feeling ill.
Upon arriving at hospital on Sunday, she was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died.
Soon after, Furtado disappeared and is now wanted for homicide and criminal association, while his girlfriend, who some media claim was also his assistant, has been detained.
The news has caused shock waves throughout the industry — Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out.
The Brazilian Plastic Surgery Society (SBPC) was quick to denounce Furtado, saying “the growing invasion of non-specialists in the specialty has provoked more and more fatalities like this one.”
“You cannot perform plastic surgery inside an apartment. Many people are selling a dream, a fantasy to patients in an unethical way and people, weakened, are often attracted to low prices, without considering whether or not the conditions are adequate,” SBPC president Niveo Steffen told AFP.
Steffen said the injection of synthetic biopolymers or polymers, like acrylic glass, is very dangerous and has caused dozens of deaths among women in Latin America, especially in Venezuela.
He said Furtado’s case demonstrates the “trivialization of cosmetic procedures by unspecialized professionals, who often aren’t doctors and are putting people at risk.”
According to the G1 Internet site, Furtado has been charged by police four times for illegally practicing medicine and crimes against consumers.