Rescue teams pull child’s body from septic tank in Jeddah

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(Civil Defense)
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(Civil Defense)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Rescue teams pull child’s body from septic tank in Jeddah

JEDDAH: A child’s body has been pulled from a septic tank in the early hours of Friday morning after the four-year-old boy was reported missing in the Makkah region, a civil defense spokesman has confirmed.

The boy’s body was found by members of the National Center for Joint Security Operations (NCSO), Jeddah's Civil Defense spokesman Col. Saeed Sarhan said.

“Rescue teams in Jeddah rushed to the location and began working on pulling the child out of the septic tank, which is two meters deep and filled with one meter of water, adjacent to a fenced courtyard,” he added,

“Rescue teams jumped into the septic tank through its nozzle.”

The child’s family had reported him missing on Wednesday.

The boy was pronounced dead by members of the Red Crescent, before being transferred to a hospital.

There have been similar deaths in Jeddah in recent years, including a man who died as he tried to pull his child – who also died – out of a sewer on Tahlia Street.

Other fatalities have included a teenager who fell in a storm drain, an Egyptian child who died in a sewer nozzle, a Yemeni child who fell in a storm drain on his way home from school, and a girl who slipped into a sewer.


Gulf meeting discusses inclusion, citizenship and rights

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), speaks at the Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday. (SPA)
Updated 14 November 2018
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Gulf meeting discusses inclusion, citizenship and rights

  • Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic

JEDDAH: The three-day Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum began in Abu Dhabi on Monday, gathering religious, intellectual and political figures from across the Middle East.
“It’s wrong to accept from individuals or institutions any justifications that threaten national unity,” said Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL).
“It’s also essential to protect legitimate freedoms, especially ones that promote and support citizenship,” he added.
“We appreciate the concept of national integration ministries in countries of religious and ethnic diversity, but… some of them suffer gaps due to the lack of participation of all national segments in the formulation of their programs,” he said.
“Some of these ministries have a single perspective that they impose on others, which results in accusations of failure or negative bias and racism,” Al-Issa added. “Also, some of these ministries may lack a social presence.”
The media should not be allowed to sacrifice national values, which protect everyone, for the sake of partisan, ideological, ethnic or financial interests, he said.
“Followers of religious and ethnic minorities have sacrificed a lot to show their loyalty to the countries that welcomed them and their parents,” he added.
“But the extremism of the far right came to reinforce prejudices at the expense of those sacrifices and the unity that brings social peace which, if undermined, can threaten the most important pillars of supreme national interest.”
Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic.