Accord on revised Pacific Rim trade pact stalled

Leaders and their spouses pose for a family photo ahead of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit leaders gala dinner in the central Vietnamese city of Danang on November 10, 2017. (AFP / Vietnam News Agency)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Accord on revised Pacific Rim trade pact stalled

DANANG, Vietnam: Talks on a Pacific Rim trade pact abandoned by US President Donald Trump appeared to have stalled Friday as Canada balked at a basic agreement worked out in ministerial-level talks hours before.
Trump pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership in January. Leaders of the 11 countries remaining in the TPP had been due to meet and endorse a deal worked out in last-minute talks overnight.
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday that the 11 leaders had to postpone their meeting on the sidelines of the annual summit of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum in Danang, Vietnam.
“It was said that it is not at a stage where (the agreement) can be confirmed at the summit level,” said Abe, who was to co-chair the meeting. He made the comments to Japanese reporters after meeting with his Canadian counterpart, Justin Trudeau, who stayed away from the planned TPP leaders’ gathering while most other leaders showed up.
There was no immediate word from Canada on its stance. However, Trudeau had said days earlier that Canada would not be rushed into an agreement.
The chances for a deal by the time the summit ends on Saturday were unclear.
Earlier in the day, officials from Japan and some other countries expressed differing opinions on whether an “agreement in principle” had been reached.
The TPP member countries are trying to find a way forward without the US, the biggest economy and, before Trump took office, one of its most assertive supporters. Trump has said he prefers country-to-country deals and is seeking to renegotiate several major trade agreements to, as he says, “put America first.”
Vietnamese officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
Trump reiterated his markedly different stance on trade before the 21-member APEC summit convened late Friday with a gala banquet.
The US president told an APEC business conference that “We are not going to let the United States be taken advantage of anymore.” He lambasted the World Trade Organization and other trade forums as unfair to the United States and reiterated his preference for bilateral trade deals, saying “I am always going to put America first.”
Trump said he would not enter into large trade agreements, alluding to US involvement in the North American Free Trade Agreement and the TPP.
In contrast, Chinese President Xi Jinping told the same group that nations need to stay committed to economic openness or risk being left behind.
The Chinese president drew loud applause when he urged support for the “multilateral trading regime” and progress toward a free-trade zone in the Asia-Pacific.
APEC operates by consensus and customarily issues nonbinding statements. TPP commitments would eventually be ratified and enforced by its members.
But even talks this week on a declaration to cap the APEC summit had to be extended for an extra half day as ministers haggled over wording. It’s unclear what the exact sticking points were, but officials have alluded to differences over the unequal impact more open trade has had on workers and concerns over automation in manufacturing that could leave many millions in a wide array of industries with no work to do.
As a developing country with a fast-growing export sector, this year’s host country, Vietnam, has a strong interest in open trade and access for its exports to consumers in the West. The summit is an occasion for its leaders to showcase the progress its economy has made thanks largely to foreign investment and trade. Danang, Vietnam’s third largest city, is in the midst of a construction boom as dozens of resorts and smaller hotels pop up along its scenic coastline.
APEC’s members are Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, the US and Vietnam.


Philippines posts 15 percent drop in cash remittance from Middle East

Updated 23 September 2018
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Philippines posts 15 percent drop in cash remittance from Middle East

  • There has been a 15 percent decrease in remittances from Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) in the Middle East, with fund transfers from Libya and Israel falling the most at 73 percent and 61 percent — Central Bank of the Philippines
  • Remittances from Kuwait fell by 20.4 percent despite resumption of OFW deployment; Bahrain showed negative 22.9 percent; transfers from Oman dropped by 38.3 percent; and Saudi Arabia showed a slide of 10.4 percent

MANILA: Cash remittance from Filipino workers (OFW), particularly those in the Middle East, saw a steep decline from January to July this year, figures from the Central Bank of the Philippines (BSP) show.
A lawmaker noted that even the lifting of the ban on deployment of Filipinos to Kuwait last May failed to stop the remittance plunge.
Based on latest BSP data, there was 15 percent decrease in remittances from OFWs in the Middle East, although fund transfers from Libya and Israel fell the most at 73 percent and 61 percent respectively.
With that, Rep. Henry Ong, chairman of the House Committee Chair on Banks & Financial Intermediaries, said the policy shift in OFW deployment priorities must happen “sooner rather than later.”
“Filipinos are being held hostage by armed groups in Libya. Israel recently welcomed President Rodrigo Duterte on a brief visit. However, the remittances from these two countries pale in comparison with those from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Kuwait, and Oman, which were in the high double-digit percentages decline,” he said.
Remittances from Kuwait fell by 20.4 percent despite the resumption of OFW deployment last May. Bahrain showed negative 22.9 percent, transfers from Oman dropped by 38.3 percent and Saudi Arabia showed a slide of 10.4 percent. 
Qatar is the exception. The remittances decline from Filipino workers there was only 6.3 percent.
The Leyte second district representative pointed out: “There should not even be Filipinos in Libya because the security situation there is horrible, but still Filipinos go because that is where they have found jobs on their own.
“OFWs clearly have bleak and low-paying job prospects here in the Philippines because our wages are way below what they can earn abroad, so we have no choice but to deploy them elsewhere, to countries that will pay them well and respect their rights as migrant workers and as people of varied gender.” .
For this to happen, Ong said the priority list of alternative countries “must include those states that are signatories to the international conventions on human rights, labor, social security, and migrant workers.
“The other criterion would be the economic growth prospects of the target host countries because that will determine how well they will be compensated for their services. OFWs will go where they are respected, wanted, and paid well.” 
Ong lamented, though, that “it does not seem the concerned top officials have what it takes to help OFWs find better jobs in new host countries.
“They are just doing bureaucratic procedures and damage control on the problems that keep cropping up, but we do not see systemic, long-term solutions. Suffering through all that are the OFWs.” 
Meanwhile, aside from the decrease in cash remittance, the Philippines also suffered a decline in deployment of OFWs in 2017 after 10 years of continuous growth.
Recruitment consultant and migration expert Emmanuel Geslani, citing statistics from the Philippine Overseas Employment Administrstion (POEA), said deployment of OFWs to 180 countries went down by 9 percent in 2017 compared ith the previous year. The year 2016, Geslani said, was a banner year of deployment for OFWs with total deployment hitting more than two million.
POEA records show that only 1,992,746 OFWs were deployed in 2017. Geslani said this is the first time after 10 years of continuous increase starting in 2008 with 1,236,613 deployment; 2009 with 1,422,382; 2010 with 1,476,826; 2011 with 1,687,463; 2012 with 1,802,031; 2013 with 1,826,804; 2014 with 1,832,668; 2015 with 1,841,205; and 2016 with 2,112,331.
Geslani said the decrease may be attributed to actors, such as the decline in the hiring of new workers to Saudi Arabia, from 219,134 in 2016 down to 163,238 in 2017. 
A decrease in the number of new hires was also noted in the rest of the top ten OFW destinations, which include Kuwait, Qatar, Hong Kong, Taiwan, the UAE, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia and Oman.
“Another reason for the decline is the increasing shift of Saudi Arabia to employ more citizens to work in companies and malls as part of its ‘Saudization’,” Geslani continued.
In addition, more major projects in the Kingdom have been shelved or delayed, resulting in the exodus of more than 30,000 Filipino skilled workers in construction, maintenance services and oil industries, he added. “Crude oil, which has stayed in the $70-80 level, has prevented Middle East countries from going on construction and infrastructure projects, except for Qatar which is preparing for the football World Cup in 2022.” 
Even the household service workers sector also dropped by 8 percent in 2017 owing to internal controls implemented by the Philippine labor officers in the Middle East, Geslani said.
For 2018, he predicts that deployment of household service workers is not expected to go beyond the 200,000 mark with the deployment ban imposed in Kuwait resulting in the loss of 40,000 jobs.