UN chief says violence against Myanmar’s Rohingyas must end

Young Rohingya Muslim refugees look on through a temporary bamboo barricade at the Thankhali refugee camp in Bangladesh's Ukhia district on November 10, 2017. More than 600,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh since late August carrying accounts of murder, rape and arson at the hands of Myanmar's powerful army during a military crackdown dubbed as "ethnic cleansing" by the UN. (AFP / Dibyangshu Sarkar)
Updated 10 November 2017
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UN chief says violence against Myanmar’s Rohingyas must end

UNITED NATIONS: Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says it is “an absolutely essential priority” to stop all violence against Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, allow them to return to their homes, and determine their legal status.
The UN chief told reporters Friday that the UN is also insisting on “unhindered humanitarian access” to all areas of northern Rakhine State, where more than 600,000 Rohingyas lived before fleeing to Bangladesh.
The latest violence began with a series of attacks Aug. 25 by Rohingya insurgents. Myanmar security forces responded with a scorched-earth campaign against Rohingya villages that the UN and human rights groups have called disproportionate and a campaign of ethnic cleansing.
Guterres called the situation “an immense tragedy,” saying that the “levels of violence and the atrocities committed are something that we cannot be silent about.”


2 Koreas, US-led UN Command meet again at Koreas’ border

In this Oct. 16, 2018, file photo provided by South Korea Defense Ministry, the US-led United Nations Command, center, South Korean and North Korean, left, military officers attend a meeting at the southern side of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea. (AP)
Updated 16 min 46 sec ago
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2 Koreas, US-led UN Command meet again at Koreas’ border

  • Seoul’s liberal government is pushing for greater engagement with North Korea, but US officials say such moves should be in tandem with global efforts to denuclearize North Korea

SEOUL, South Korea: Military officers from the two Koreas and the US-led UN Command met again at the Koreas’ border village Monday to examine an ongoing effort to disarm the area.
Demetallizing the Panmunjom village inside the Koreas’ heavily fortified border was among many agreements the Koreas struck in September to lower military tensions between the rivals.
Under the deals, troops from the Koreas began clearing mines from Panmunjom earlier this month before withdrawing weapons and guard posts there. They eventually plan to have 35 unarmed personnel from each side guard the village.
Monday’s trilateral talks are the second in kind in about a week. Officially, the village is jointly overseen by North Korea and the UN Command, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War that ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty.
The talks are to review the demining work and discussing future steps in the area, South Korea’s Defense Ministry said in a statement.
As part of the September agreements, the two Koreas are removing mines from another frontline area where they plan their first-ever joint searches for the remains of soldiers killed during the Korean War. The Koreas also plan to establish buffer zones along their land and sea boundaries, and a no-fly zone above the border.
General-level officers from the Koreas are to meet at Panmunjom on Friday to discuss more details about how to implement the tension-reduction deals, according to the South Korean Defense Ministry.
Also Monday, officials from the Koreas separately met at their recently launched liaison office at the North Korean border town of Kaesong for talks on how to cooperate in forestry sectors.
Seoul’s liberal government is pushing for greater engagement with North Korea, but US officials say such moves should be in tandem with global efforts to denuclearize North Korea.