3 hurt after car deliberately rams people in southern France

Google map showing the general location of Toulouse, France.
Updated 10 November 2017
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3 hurt after car deliberately rams people in southern France

TOULOUSE, France: A man deliberately drove his car into a group of people outside a school near Toulouse in southern France on Friday, injuring three Chinese students, police sources said.
The driver of the vehicle, a 28-year-old man, was known to police for committing minor offenses but was not on a terrorism watchlist, the sources said. He was arrested at the scene.
One of the students, a young woman, was being treated for serious head injuries.
“For the moment, it is not being looked at as a terrorist incident although it is also not ruled out,” the Toulouse prosecutor said in a statement.
The driver has long suffered from psychological problems and was hospitalized until Dec. 2016, the prosecutor said.
More than 240 people have been killed in France since early 2015 in attacks by Islamist militants or assailants inspired by the Daesh group.
Monday will mark the second anniversary of attacks in Paris that killed more than 130 people.
Earlier this week, French police arrested nine people and another was arrested in Switzerland in coordinated counter-terrorism swoops.


Prince William visits Namibia on conservation tour

Updated 24 September 2018
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Prince William visits Namibia on conservation tour

  • The tour will see the prince visit Tanzania and Kenya
  • It precedes the 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference in London next month

WINDHOEK: Prince William arrived in Namibia on Monday on the first leg of a tour to learn more about wildlife conservation in Africa ahead of a London-based wildlife conference next month.
Namibia is home to the largest black rhino population, at more than 2,000, whose horn is sought after by smugglers.
The Duke of Cambridge, visiting as president of United for Wildlife, which fights illegal trade in wildlife, and patron of Tusk, which promotes conservation, aims to better understand conservation in Namibia, said British High Commissioner to Namibia Kate Airey.
“The prince has been very keen ahead of that conference to talk to government and also to see that experience in the field,” said Airey.
The tour, which will see the prince visit Tanzania and Kenya, precedes the 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference in London next month.
Namibia passed legislation in 1996 giving local communities the power to create their own conservancies and benefit from wildlife on communal land, allowing them to work with private companies to create their own tourism products.
“Our model is very simple but very effective because we involve communities. There is nothing you can do to succeed in conservation of wildlife without involving communities,” said Namibia’s Environment and Tourism Minister Pohamba Shifeta.
Communal conservancies have grown to 82 from four in 1998, according to the Namibia Tourism Board.