Drone strike in Somalia kills ‘several militants’

Residents walk at the scene of a blast on October 29, 2017, a day after two car bombs exploded in Mogadishu. On Thursday, a US drone strike killed “several" Al-Shabab militants in Somalia on Thursday afternoon, the US Africa Command said on Friday. (AFP / Mohamed Abdiwahab/File photo)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Drone strike in Somalia kills ‘several militants’

MOGADISHU: A US drone strike killed “several militants” with Al-Shabab in Somalia, the military said, as the Trump administration increasingly targets what has become the deadliest Islamic extremist group in Africa.
The strike was carried out Thursday afternoon in the Bay Region, about 160 km west of the capital, Mogadishu, according to a statement by the US Africa Command. A spokeswoman told The Associated Press that no civilians were anywhere near the strike.
The US military says it has carried out 22 airstrikes this year against the Al-Qaeda-linked Al-Shabab and the smaller Daesh presence in Somalia after the Trump administration approved expanded military efforts.
The US says the latest airstrike, like others, occurred in cooperation with Somalia’s government.
Earlier this month the US military carried out its first airstrikes in Somalia against Daesh, which is a small but growing presence in the northern part of the Horn of Africa nation. Many of its fighters are reported to be former Al-Shabab members who switched allegiances.
The Somalia-based Al-Shabab has been blamed for the massive truck bombing in Mogadishu that killed more than 350 people in the country’s worst-ever attack. The extremist group often targets high-profile areas such as hotels in the capital.
While Somalia’s president has vowed a “state of war” in response to last month’s attack, concern is growing about the gradual security handover that has begun from a 22,000-strong African Union force to Somali national forces.
The AU this week announced the beginning of its withdrawal from the long-chaotic and still heavily fractured nation, saying it will cut 1,000 troops by the end of the year.
The AU pullout is set to be complete by the end of 2020.


British defense contractor under fraud investigation over suspected corruption in Algeria

Updated 18 min 53 sec ago
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British defense contractor under fraud investigation over suspected corruption in Algeria

  • Ultra said in a statement that it had referred itself to the British fraud authorities and that the SFO investigation concerned the business conduct of Ultra, its subsidiaries, employees and associated persons
  • The SFO’s investigation into Ultra, which makes military electronics for land, air and sea forces, follows probes into other British companies operating in the defense sector including Rolls-Royce and BAE Systems

LONDON: Ultra Electronics on Thursday announced that the UK’s Serious Fraud Office had opened a criminal investigation into “suspected corruption in the conduct of business” by the British defense contractor in Algeria.
Ultra said in a statement that it had referred itself to the British fraud authorities and that the SFO investigation concerned the business conduct of Ultra, its subsidiaries, employees and associated persons.
“Given the stage of these matters, it is not possible to estimate reliably what effect the outcome of this matter may have on the group,” Ultra said, adding that it continued to co-operate with the SFO.
The SFO in a statement said it was looking into Ultra but said it could not provide additional information as the investigation “is live.”
Ultra shares were down 6 percent in early trade.
The SFO’s investigation into Ultra, which makes military electronics for land, air and sea forces, follows probes into other British companies operating in the defense sector including Rolls-Royce and BAE Systems.
Ultra Electronics’s biggest market is North America with just 17 percent of its revenue coming from what it calls “rest of the world.” It does not mention Algeria in its annual report.
Ultra, which last month abandoned a bid for US company Sparton Corp. due to anti-trust concerns, is currently without a chief executive.
Douglas Caster assumed the role of executive chairman last year after the previous CEO quit. New CEO Simon Pryce is due to join in June.
The SFO has been criticized by lawmakers in the past over its efforts to bring companies and senior individuals to book. More recently it has secured deferred prosecution agreements with Rolls-Royce and Tesco and filed unprecedented criminal charges against Barclays and former senior executives.