Shakira cancels first appearance of El Dorado World Tour

Shakira and Gerard Piqué in this file photo. (Reuters)
Updated 10 November 2017
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Shakira cancels first appearance of El Dorado World Tour

JEDDAH: Doctors have advised Shakira not to perform in the first concert of her “El Dorado World Tour” which was scheduled to be held on Nov. 8, according to Sayidaty and Hello magazines.
The 40-year-old singing sensation announced the news through her official account on Instagram saying she has pain in her vocal cords preventing her from holding the concert on time.
Shakira said: “My doctors have ordered me on vocal rest to avoid any greater damage that could keep me from performing.”
The El Dorado World Tour is the upcoming sixth world tour by the Colombian singer, and will be staged in support of her 11th studio album “El Dorado.” Comprising 36 shows so far, the tour will visit Europe and North America, with confirmed Latin American dates to be announced later.
The pop star also wrote a message which she posted on both her official website on Nov. 7 and her Instagram account in both English and Spanish.
“I am focusing on recovering now to be able to kick off on November 10th in Paris, as soon as I get the green light from my doctors,” she shared. “Thanks as always from the bottom of my heart for all the support and love you’ve shown me heading into this tour. I hope to make it worth the wait and see you all very soon!”
Shakira was rumored to have separated from her lover Barcelona player Gerard Pique. Gerard Piqué Bernabéu is a Spanish professional footballer who plays as a center-back for FC Barcelona and the Spanish national team.


Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

A still from the film.
Updated 19 July 2018
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Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

DENVER: Like a gallery wall-sized enlargement of a microscopic image, “Scenes from a Marriage” is all about size, space and perspective.
Directed by Ingmar Bergman — whose birth centenary was marked this week — at 281 minutes long, its unwieldly length presents an intimidating canvas, yet the claustrophobic intimacy of its gaze is unprecedented: The two leads are alone in nearly every scene, many of which play out for more than a half-hour at a time.
Premiered in 1973, the work is technically a TV mini-series, but such is its legend that theaters continue to program its nearly five-hour arc in its entirety. A three-hour cinematic edit was prepared for US theater consumption a year later (it won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was ruled ineligible for the corresponding Oscar).
Not a lot a happens but, then again, everything does. Shot over four months on a shoestring budget, its six chapters punctuate the period of a decade. The audience are voyeurs, dropped amid the precious and pivotal moments which may not make up a life, but come to define it.
We meet the affluent Swedish couple Marianne and Johan — played by regular screen collaborators Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson, both of whom clocked at least 10 Bergman credits — gloating about ten years’ happy marriage to a visiting reporter. This opening magazine photoshoot is the only time we see their two children on camera, and inevitably the image projected is as glossy, reflective and disposable as the paper it will be printed on.
The pressures, pains and communication breakdowns which tear this unsuited pair apart are sadly familiar. The series was blamed for a spike in European divorce rates. It may be difficult to survive the piece liking either lead, but impossible not to emerge sharing deep pathos with them both. Sadly, much of the script is said to be drawn from Bergman’s real-life off-screen relationship with Ullmann.
It’s a hideously humane, surgical close-up likely to leave even the happiest couple groping into the ether on their way out of the cinema.