Data firm CEO: Reached out to WikiLeaks about Clinton emails

CEO of Cambridge Analytica, Alexander Nix, speaks during the Web Summit, Europe's biggest tech conference, in Lisbon, Portugal, in this November 9, 2017 photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 11 November 2017
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Data firm CEO: Reached out to WikiLeaks about Clinton emails

WASHINGTON: The CEO of a data firm that worked for President Donald Trump’s campaign says he reached out to WikiLeaks during the campaign about obtaining emails related to Democrat Hillary Clinton.
Alexander Nix, CEO of Cambridge Analytica, says the outreach was in “early June 2016” after WikiLeaks Editor Julian Assange had publicly claimed he had Clinton emails and planned to publish them. Nix says his firm asked a speaker’s agency for Assange if he “might share that information.” But he says Assange turned him down.
Nix’s comments Thursday at the Web Summit technology conference in Lisbon, Portugal, were his first acknowledgement of the outreach.
Assange had previously told The Associated Press that WikiLeaks had rejected a “request for information” from Cambridge Analytica. The Wall Street Journal first reported Nix’s comments.


Daesh claims responsibility for deadly attack outside voters’ registration office in Kabul

Updated 22 April 2018
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Daesh claims responsibility for deadly attack outside voters’ registration office in Kabul

  • The attack will not deter Afghans from voting, says Afghanistan's chief executive Abdullah Abdullah
  • The attack was the deadliest against the elections process since the launch of registration more than a week ago in Afghanistan

KABUL: Daesh claimed responsibility for a suicide attack that killed more than 60 would-be voters in the Afghan capital of Kabul on Sunday.

The attack may cause further concern among Afghans who already seem disinterested in registering for the crucial elections to select a new parliament and choose new members for provincial councils on Oct. 20.

It occurred in the Dashte Barchi part of Kabul, a Shia-dominated area where Daesh has conducted a number of deadly attacks against the Shia-populated areas in recent months.

Interior ministry officials said the bomber blew himself up outside offices used for voters’ registration where, according to the health ministry, 63 died and 119 other people were wounded.

Some schoolchildren were among the victims, hospital officials told Arab News.

Blood-stained National ID papers and voters’ photos are seen on the ground outside a voter registration center, after a suicide attack in Kabul, Sunday, April 22, 2018. (AP Photo)

Abdullah Abdullah, the country’s chief executive, in a tweet, said the attack will not deter Afghans from voting.

“I strongly condemn the terrorist attack on the voters’ registration center in Kabul. I stand with those affected by this cowardly attack. Our resolve for fair and transparent elections will continue and terrorists won’t win against the will of the Afghan people.”

Sunday’s attack was the deadliest against the elections process since the launch of registration more than a week ago in Afghanistan. Other attacks were minor and happened in remote areas.

The turnout of those registering is said to be far lower — a sign of lack of interest among Afghans because of fraudulent past elections and the way many leaders and politicians failed to deliver on even minor promises given during the campaign.