Role of youth in confronting global issues highlighted at World Forum in Egypt

In this photo provided by Egypt's state news agency, MENA, Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi addresses participants in the "World Youth Forum," a government-organized event, in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP)
Updated 11 November 2017
0

Role of youth in confronting global issues highlighted at World Forum in Egypt

RIYADH: World peace, prosperity, harmony and progress were the ambitious aims of the World Youth Forum (WYF) attended by a Saudi youth delegation in Sharm El-Sheikh this week.
Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi inaugurated the WYF, visited by 3,203 young men and women from 110 countries, in the presence of prominent Arab and international figures in the Egyptian resort city.
The Saudi youth delegation participated as speakers in a number of sessions including one on the “Role of Cinema in Terrorism and Extremism,” and “Volunteerism and Community Work.”
The Saudi delegation included 45 young men and women representing a group of Saudi universities, the King Abdul Aziz Center for National Dialogue and the Foreign Ministry, said Abdullah Al-Saqabi, director of the student activities and partnership department at King Saud University.
The WYF, which finished on Friday, consisted of four themes. The first theme, “Global Youth Issues”, included discussions on terrorism and how young people will play a meaningful role in confronting the issues of climate change, migration and refugees.
The second theme, “Sustainable Development, Technology and Entrepreneurship,” reviewed international experiences in achieving sustainable development and presented innovative youth experiences in entrepreneurship, while discussing the impact of technology on young people’s lives.
The third theme was about civilizations and cultures, and included subjects such as the arts and literature, cultural identity, how to integrate civilizations and cultures, and how to benefit from the rich diversity that results from dealing with the damage caused by conflicts and wars.
The final theme, “Making Future Leaders,” assessed experiences at the international level that will train youth to become future leaders.


2.4 million pilgrims in final Hajj rituals as world’s Muslims begin Eid celebrations

Updated 22 August 2018
0

2.4 million pilgrims in final Hajj rituals as world’s Muslims begin Eid celebrations

  • Saudi authorities say 2.37 million pilgrims, most of them from abroad, have arrived this year for the five-day Hajj
  • As pilgrims returned to Makkah to complete the final Hajj rituals, Muslims throughout the world began celebrating Eid Al-Adha

MAKKAH: More than two million Muslims took part in the symbolic stoning of the devil on Tuesday, the last major ritual of the Hajj pilgrimage that heralded the start of Eid Al-Adha.

Clad in white robes signifying a state of purity, men and women from 165 countries converged on Jamrat to perform the ritual from a three-story bridge.

Large fans sprayed water over the crowd as temperatures climbed to 44C.

Pilgrim Moueeneddine Ahmed, 35, from Bangladesh, complained of the scorching heat but said he was “very excited” to take part in the ceremony.

He also praised the Saudi authorities for maintaining order despite the vast crowd. “There’s a lot of security. Very disciplined,” he said.

In keeping with customs he said he would then “shave his head” and trade the white seamless robe he wore for the Hajj for his “normal clothes.”

 

 

Tens of thousands of security forces, including police and civil defense, have been deployed for Hajj, according to Saudi authorities.

Firas Al-Khashani, 33, a pilgrim from Jordan, was equally impressed. “The police assistance and the services were all extraordinary,” he said. 


“It is a beautiful feeling,” said Hazem Darweesh, 31, from Egypt. “The beauty of it is in the difficulty of performing it. It brings you closer to God.

Saudi authorities say 2.37 million pilgrims, most of them from abroad, have arrived this year for the five-day Hajj.

”
King Salman of Saudi Arabia and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman received well-wishers on Tuesday at the Royal Court in Mina Palace.


“Our country’s greatest honor is to serve God’s guests,” the king said. “On Eid Al-Adha, I ask God to complete the pilgrims’ Hajj and to perpetuate goodness and peace for our nation and all other countries.”


As pilgrims returned to Makkah to complete the final Hajj rituals, Muslims throughout the world began celebrating Eid Al-Adha — the “feast of sacrifice” commemorating the willingness of the Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son on God’s command.

Palestinians visited the Haram Al-Sharif in Jerusalem’s Old City after morning prayers.

The festival was also celebrated across Africa and Asia. Thousands prayed in a field in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, in the Somali capital Mogadishu, and at Almaty central mosque in Kazakhstan.