Karl Lagerfeld sparks fury over Holocaust-related comments on Syrian migrants

This file photo taken on October 3, 2017 shows German fashion designer for Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld arriving for the Chanel women’s 2018 Spring/Summer ready-to-wear collection fashion show in Paris. (AFP)
Updated 14 November 2017
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Karl Lagerfeld sparks fury over Holocaust-related comments on Syrian migrants

PARIS: Fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld has sparked outrage by evoking the Holocaust as he attacked German Chancellor Angela Merkel for opening the country’s borders to migrants.
“One cannot — even if there are decades between them — kill millions of Jews so you can bring millions of their worst enemies in their place,” he told a French television show.
“I know someone in Germany who took a young Syrian and after four days said, ‘The greatest thing Germany invented was the Holocaust,’” he added.
Several hundred people lodged official complaints about Lagerfeld’s comments, the French media regulator said Monday after he appeared on the “Salut les terriens!” (Hello Earthlings!) talkshow on the C8 channel on Saturday.
The veteran Chanel designer, who was born in Hamburg just as Adolf Hitler came to power, had earlier lambasted Merkel for taking more than one million asylum seekers since the migrant crisis of 2015.
“Merkel had already millions and millions (of immigrants) who are well integrated and who work and all is well... she had no need to take another million to improve her image as the wicked stepmother after the Greek crisis,” said Lagerfeld.
“Suddenly we see the pastor’s daughter,” he said in reference to Merkel’s father, who was a Protestant minister in the former East Germany.
Lagerfeld, who is rarely afraid of controversy, said he was going to “say something horrific” before criticizing the chancellor for the “huge error” of accepting so many refugees from war-torn Syria and elsewhere.
“Look at France, the land of human rights, which has taken, I don’t know, 10,000 or 20,000,” he added.
The French TV regulator, the CSA, said it had received several hundred complaints over the weekend about Lagerfeld’s comment, and was looking at the program.
The designer was roasted for the outburst on social media, although some users also came to his defense.


Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

Updated 26 June 2019
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Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

  • The pop culture icon unveiled the new ‘Kimono’ line on Twitter
  • But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan

TOKYO: American television star Kim Kardashian has sparked debate in Japan by naming her new line of shapewear “Kimono,” prompting some to accuse her of disrespecting the traditional outfit.
The pop culture icon unveiled the new “Kimono” line on Twitter, revealing she had been working for a year on the underwear to offer “solutions for women that actually work.”
But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan, with some offering their criticism on Twitter using the hashtag #KimOhNo.
“She’s been to Japan many times. I’m shocked. She has no respect,” tweeted one user in Japanese.
“I like Kim Kardashian, but please pick a name other than kimono if it’s underwear,” wrote another.
“The Japanese government should file a protest against Kardashian,” wrote a third.
Kimono literally means “something to wear,” while Kardashian’s use of it appeared to be a play on her first name. The new line’s website offered no explanation, and Kardashian has yet to respond to her online detractors.
And not everyone was opposed to the name, with some users arguing it could offer a chance to promote a traditional outfit that is declining in popularity even in Japan.
Once a standard of the Japanese wardrobe, the kimono is now often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and coming-of-age ceremonies, and is mostly worn by women.
And while the elaborate outfits might appear to have little in common with the snug garb being offered by Kardashian, kimonos are not only often hugely expensive but known for being hard to wear.
Women frequently hire experts to dress them in kimono because the outfit requires seemingly endless nipping, tucking and strapping.