High-profile speakers grace Misk forum in Riyadh

Updated 15 November 2017
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High-profile speakers grace Misk forum in Riyadh

RIYADH: The second Misk Global Forum, the biggest youth event in the region, will be inaugurated on Wednesday by Abdullah Al-Sawaha, minister of communications and information technology.
The forum will include an array of local and international speakers and hundreds of participants, and will be held at the Four Seasons Hotel in Riyadh.
Organized by the Prince Mohammed bin Salman Foundation (MiSK), participants will include Saudi and international business leaders in technology, innovation and science.
Speakers include Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih, Bill Gates, Skype co-founder Jonas Kielberg, LinkedIn co-founder Alan Blue, and representatives from technology companies such as Google, Microsoft, IBM, GE and Intel.
Participants include Faisal J. Abbas, Arab News editor in chief, and Adam ArRion, chairman of the American entertainment company EMC, among others.
Established in 2016, the Misk Global Forum brings young leaders, creators and thinkers together with established global innovators.
Shaima Hamidaddin, executive manager and project leader of the forum, said it has become a prominent global meeting to discuss important issues concerning youths and their role in building knowledge-based economies.
This will help them forge ahead with scientific and technological developments worldwide, she added.


Hafez Gallery organizes art fair

Syrian artist Osama Esid’s photography explores personal identity. (Supplied)
Updated 3 min 30 sec ago
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Hafez Gallery organizes art fair

JEDDAH: The Hafez Gallery has organized the Shara Art Fair at the Saudi Art Council’s headquarters, bringing together five galleries from around Jeddah.
“I’ve been exhibiting with the Hafez Gallery for the past four years, ever since it started,” Osama Esid, from Damascus, told Arab News.
His painting at the art fair, “Zamakan,” is “about refugees sinking as they try to cross vast stretches of water,” he said.
He created the painting “in the dark to show the final resting place of these refugees,” he added. “I’d use brushes, sticks, and sometimes even my fingers.”
Artist Bashair Hawsawi told Arab News that his piece, showing a couple of broom heads attached back to back, “reflects the experiences I went through this year, because I want to clean my thoughts and ideas from negative
things.” He added: “When I was young, people would comment on my shyness and weakness, so I started to be aware of this, and that helped me work out who I really wanted to be.”
Khalid Zahid, known for his Islamic-themed modern art, exhibited balloons shaped like mosques in different colors. “The concept is called ‘Joyful.’ What I wanted to show was how balloons bring joy whether you’re young or old,” he told Arab News.
“As for the shape, I wanted to show how Islam brings joy to people. That’s why they (the balloons) look like mosques.”