Hellebuyck’s 32 saves lead Jets over Coyotes 4-1

Winnipeg Jets goalie Connor Hellebuyck (37) makes a save with Arizona Coyotes forward Christian Fischer (36) looking for a rebound during the first period at Bell MTS Place. (Terrence Lee-USA Today Sports)
Updated 15 November 2017
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Hellebuyck’s 32 saves lead Jets over Coyotes 4-1

WINNIPEG, Manitoba: Connor Hellebuyck bounced back in a big way.
Pulled in a loss to Vegas last week, Hellebuyck made 32 saves and the Winnipeg Jets defeated Arizona 4-1 on Tuesday night for their second victory over the struggling Coyotes in four days.
Hellebuyck, who began the season as the Jets’ No. 2 goalie, improved to 9-1-2. His stellar play has turned him into the starter.
“This was definitely my redemption game,” Hellebuyck said. “Any time you get pulled you have to enter strong, and I’m glad the guys played well in front of me.”
On a night when the Jets inducted Dale Hawerchuk into their Hall of Fame and lifted his No. 10 banner to the rafters, the home team easily handled the franchise that moved from Winnipeg to Arizona 21 years ago.
Joel Armia, Bryan Little and Adam Lowry scored for the Jets (10-4-3) during an 11-minute stretch in the second period to turn a one-goal game into a 4-0 cushion.
Andrew Copp opened the scoring in the first for Winnipeg, which also beat the Coyotes in Arizona last weekend to finish a three-game road trip.
“We can’t always rely on (Mark) Scheifele’s line to do the heavy work,” Little said. “There’s going to be games where they’re going to be off or not get on the score sheet. It’s up to the other lines to chip in.”
Alex Goligoski’s goal 5:21 into the third spoiled Hellebuyck’s bid for his first shutout of the season.
Antti Raanta made 10 saves on 13 shots for Arizona (2-15-3) before being chased from the game after Little’s breakaway goal 5:08 into the second. Scott Wedgewood stopped 16 of 17 shots in relief.
“Thirteen shots, they get three goals,” Arizona coach Rick Tocchet said. “Right now we have to play a perfect game to win. Hellebuyck, he made some unbelievable saves, and the next thing you know we’re just chasing the game.
“You’ve got to make plays and we didn’t score. How do you do that? You’ve got to keep working at it. There’s no method. We’re not going to go trade for Mario Lemieux.”
Lowry benefited from a turnover in the Arizona zone and immediately snapped a shot past Wedgewood with 7:21 left in the second.
The Coyotes, who have the worst record in the NHL, lost their fifth straight game and have dropped seven of eight.
“I’ve been saying it all year: You can’t complain, you can’t moan. Like, just go play, work hard,” left wing Brendan Perlini said. “There’s no other special secret or special juice. You just have to work your way out of it, everyone, shift after shift.”
Winnipeg has won three of four.
NOTES: The Jets killed off three straight penalties in the first period, when Arizona outshot Winnipeg 13-9. ... The Jets inducted Hawerchuk, the Calder Trophy winner in 1982 as NHL Rookie of the Year, into their new Hall of Fame during a 13-minute pregame ceremony that yielded boisterous chants of “Ducky, Ducky” — Hawerchuk’s nickname — from the crowd. His number hangs next to those of three other stars of the bygone Jets era: Anders Hedberg, Ulf Nilsson and Bobby Hull. Jets players wore a silver No. 10 patch on their sweaters to honor Hawerchuk. “It’s a special night. Obviously, he means a ton to this city and organization,” Lowry said. “Any time you have him in the building it’s a happy night for the fans. It’s nice to send them home happy with a good result as well.”


‘Good, but not good enough’: Juan Antonio Pizzi on Saudi Arabia’s defeat to Uruguay

Updated 20 June 2018
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‘Good, but not good enough’: Juan Antonio Pizzi on Saudi Arabia’s defeat to Uruguay

  • A Luis Suaréz goal midway through the first half gave Uruguay a 1-0 win
  • Pizzi had spoken passionately about the need for his side to demonstrate a higher level of focus and performance

ROSTOV-ON-DON: Good, but not good enough.
That was what Juan Antonio Pizzi stated as he declared himself pleased with his team’s performance in the 1-0 defeat to Uruguay on Wednesday night.
But he lamented his side’s lack of firepower as they exited the World Cup after just two matches.
Pizzi had spoken passionately about the need for his side to demonstrate a higher level of focus and performance in Rostov-on-Don after losing their opening game 5-0 to hosts Russia in Moscow last week.
The Argentine got his wish with a display that saw the Green Falcons fight throughout and edge possession against a Uruguay side ranked 14th in the world.
A Luis Suaréz goal midway through the first half after poor goalkeeping from Mohammed Al-Owais, however, was enough to hand the Green Falcons a 12th successive World Cup defeat.
The result means that even with a win against Egypt on Monday, the Green Falcons are no longer capable of progressing to the knock-out stages from Group A.
“We had a lot of ball possession and were able to impose our style of play and distribution,” said Pizzi. “We conceded a goal from a random play and didn’t have the weapons or tools to try to equalize. We kept the ball well and weren’t really troubled defensively, but lacked that ability to score.”
Indeed, for all their possession, Saudi Arabia have managed just three shots on target in 180 minutes of football. Against Russia, they failed to muster a single effort on target and the managed just three against Uruguay, two of which came in the final minutes when they knew they had to score or face elimination. None of the three shots came from a striker.
“This is our weakness. We have good ball possession, but no effectiveness. We lack the depth and skill required to win these games,” Pizzi added. “We have that deficiency and have looked for solutions, but we haven’t quite come up with one yet. But that is one of the reasons great forward are in high demand and are the elite players in world football.”
Pizzi had made four changes ahead of the match, dropping goalkeeper Abdullah Al-Mayouf in favor of Al-Owais and introducing Ali Al-Bulayhi at the heart of the defense alongside Osama Hawsawi. Further upfield, Hattan Bahberi came in for Yahya Al-Shehri and Fahad Al-Muwallad replaced Mohammed Al-Sahlawi. The changes, particularly the inclusion of Bahberi, seemed to give the side more impetus in midfield.
“The difference between the performance in the first game and this game is enormous,” Pizzi said. “The only way to compete at this level is to play at the level we did here. And even then it was not enough even to get a draw. Undoubtedly there were other factors aside from the pressure of playing in the opening game that made a difference, but it’s true that the difference was enormous.”
Many critics had predicted a deluge of goals from the likes of Suarez and Cavani, yet both were kept at bay. Save for a couple of half-chances early on, neither came close to scoring until the 23rd minute.
A corner from Carlos Sanchez sailed into the area and when Al-Owais came for it but failed to connect with his punch, Barcelona forward Suaréz was left with the simplest of tap-ins. He was so caught off-guard, he actually looked surprised as he reeled away in celebration.
“I believe you cannot be relaxed in any match,” Suarez said when asked by a Uruguayan journalist whether he had taken it easy against the Saudis.
“We wanted to win and to progress to the knock-out stage and this game simply showed how difficult it is. That’s the World Cup for you though and we are obviously delighted with how we have performed so far to progress.”
Uruguay coach Oscar Tabarez did not share his striker’s sentiments.
“Saudi Arabia wanted to excel and give a better account of themselves after losing to Russia,” he said.
“They did that very well and we have to respect them. But what surprised me the most is how we played. We underperformed.”