Volkswagen to invest €22.8 billion in core brand until 2022

Analysts see reviving the Volkswagen brand, which has long suffered from high staff and development costs, as crucial to the group’s ability to recover from a diesel emissions scandal that has gripped the carmaker. (Reuters)
Updated 18 November 2017
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Volkswagen to invest €22.8 billion in core brand until 2022

FRANKFURT: Volkswagen will invest €22.8 billion (SR100.85 billion) in its main car brand over the next five years, it said on Saturday, a day after it announced a spending program aimed at bolstering its position as a maker of electric cars.
Most of that sum, around €14 billion, will be spent in Germany, Volkswagen said, adding that one of the key measures included a €1 billion injection to transform the carmaker’s Zwickau plant into a pure e-mobility facility.
“The investment package which has now been adopted will give a decisive boost to the largest product and technology offensive in the history of the brand,” Herbert Diess, Chief Executive of the Volkswagen brand and a VW management board member, said.
Analysts see reviving the VW brand, which has long suffered from high staff and development costs, as crucial to the group’s ability to recover from a diesel emissions scandal that has gripped the carmaker.
The investments unveiled on Saturday are part of Volkswagen’s €72 billion spending plan for the 2018-2022 period that was announced on Friday.


Lion Air: Passenger numbers fell less than 5 percent after deadly crash

Updated 18 min 4 sec ago
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Lion Air: Passenger numbers fell less than 5 percent after deadly crash

  • “It was under 5 percent compared to the traffic at the same month last year,” said Lion Air CEO on November passenger numbers
  • He said Lion Air did not “clearly understand” whether the crash was responsible for the fall in traffic in November

JAKARTA: Lion Air said on Monday passenger numbers dropped by less than 5 percent in November compared to a year earlier, after one of its Boeing Co. 737 MAX jets crashed in late October killing all 189 people on board.
“There was a decline but it wasn’t too significant,” the airline’s CEO Edward Sirait told television network CNN Indonesia. “It was under 5 percent compared to the traffic at the same month last year.”
He said Lion Air did not “clearly understand” whether the crash was responsible for the fall in traffic in November, which he said was a low season for travel.
The airline, Indonesia’s largest, is privately owned and does not publicly release traffic statistics or financial results.
Sirait said last week Lion Air was considering canceling orders for 737 MAX jets but it had not yet made a decision.
Sources told Reuters that relations between the airline and Boeing had worsened in a spat over responsibility for the crash.
The airline has 190 Boeing jets worth $22 billion at list prices waiting to be delivered, on top of 197 already taken, making it one of the largest US export customers.
Bankers and some analysts say Lion Air and Southeast Asian rivals over-expanded and would be comfortable with fewer orders.
Boeing has declined to comment on contractual matters but industry sources say aerospace companies rarely leave room for unilateral cancelations except in exceptional circumstances.
The cause of the Oct. 29 crash into the Java Sea has yet to be determined.