Fighting leaves 7 dead in Indian-controlled Kashmir

Kashmiri women grieve as they watch the funeral procession on Nov. 14, 2017 of a rebel killed in fighting with Indian troops. On Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, six more suspected rebels were killed in a fierce gunfight with Indian troops. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)
Updated 18 November 2017
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Fighting leaves 7 dead in Indian-controlled Kashmir

SRINAGAR, India: Six suspected rebels and an air force commando were killed Saturday in a fierce gunfight in Indian-administered Kashmir which also injured another soldier, the Indian army said.
The shootout began when soldiers cordoned off a neighborhood in the northern area of Hajjin after a tip-off that armed militants were hiding there, said army spokesman Col. Rajesh Kalia.
“Six terrorists have been killed in the encounter,” Kalia told AFP.
“One IAF (India Air Force) soldier was martyred and another army soldier was injured.”
On Friday a militant and a police officer were killed in the outskirts of the main city of Srinagar during a brief shootout.
Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since the end of British colonial rule in 1947. Both claim the former Himalayan kingdom in full.
Rebel groups have for decades fought Indian soldiers and paramilitaries deployed in the disputed region, demanding independence or a merger of the territory with Pakistan.
The fighting has left tens of thousands, mostly civilians, dead.
India accuses Pakistan of sending fighters across their de facto border in Kashmir to launch attacks on its forces.
Islamabad denies the allegation, saying it only provides moral and diplomatic support for the Kashmiri struggle for the right to self-determination.


Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

Updated 24 min 53 sec ago
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Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

  • Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found
  • The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa

NEW YORK: Asylum seekers moving to Europe have raised their adopted nations’ economic output, lowered unemployment and not placed a burden on public finances, scientists said on Wednesday.
An analysis of economic and migration data for the last three decades found asylum seekers added to gross domestic products and boosted net tax revenues by as much as 1 percent, said a study published in Science Advances by French economists.
The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa.
An annual report by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees released on Tuesday showed the global number of refugees grew by a record 2.9 million in 2017 to 25.4 million.
The research from 1985 to 2015 looked at asylum seekers — migrants who demonstrate a fear of persecution in their homeland in order to be resettled in a new country.
“The cliché that international migration is associated with economic ‘burden’ can be dispelled,” wrote the scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research, the University of Clermont-Auvergne and Paris-Nanterre University.
The research analyzed data from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.
Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found. They marginally lowered unemployment rates and had a near-zero impact of public finances, it said.
Greece, where the bulk of migrants fleeing civil war in Syria have entered Europe, was not included because fiscal data before 1990 was unavailable, it said.
Chad Sparber, an associate professor of economics at the US-based Colgate University, said the study was a reminder there is no convincing economic case against humanitarian migration.
But he warned against dismissing the views of residents who might personally feel a negative consequence of immigration.
“There are people who do lose or suffer,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
“Immigration on balance is good,” he said. “But I still recognize that it’s not true for every person.”