Lamborghini Terzo Millennio: A visionary electric hypercar

The Terzo Millennio from Lamborghini
Updated 19 November 2017
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Lamborghini Terzo Millennio: A visionary electric hypercar

LONDON: Lamborghini has revealed details of its electric hypercar concept, Terzo Millennio (Third Millennium).
The concept, developed in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, addresses key areas of electric technology including energy storage, innovative materials, propulsion systems and design.
The Terzo will use electric supercapacitors instead of traditional batteries to give it extra power. More advanced carbon-fiber structures are used in the Terzo Millennio and the body shell will gather energy for storage purposes.
The project also aims to develop a “self-healing” carbon-fiber structure, which contains materials that can repair cracks and other structural damage automatically.
Each wheel will be driven by an integrated electric motor.
Thanks to the four supercapacitors and the lack of an internal combustion engine, the designers have had more freedom when crafting the hypercar.
Lamborghini officials insist that this concept does not mean that Lamborghini is going fully electric or even hybrid, and said that it will continue to produce its cylinder engines.


Beijing ponders support for petrol-electric hybrids

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Updated 13 July 2019
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Beijing ponders support for petrol-electric hybrids

  • Hybrid cars sold in China include versions of Toyota’s Corolla, Levin and Camry sedans, and versions of Honda’s Accord and CR-V

BEIJING: China is considering re-classifying petrol-electric hybrid vehicles so they get more favorable treatment than all-petrol or diesel counterparts under clean car rules, making it easier for automakers to meet environment quotas and offer more choice.
Global hybrid leaders Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. Ltd. would be among the biggest beneficiaries of such change, which could allow them to make more hybrids and less of the more costly all-electric vehicles, experts said, after reviewing the draft policy proposal published on Tuesday by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.
China has some of the world’s strictest rules regarding the production of greenhouse gas-emitting vehicles, as it battles unhealthy levels of air pollution in its crowded cities.
In the draft proposal, hybrids would still be considered fossil-fueled but re-classified as “low fuel consumption passenger vehicles.” Significantly, the number of negative points incurred for making hybrids will be less than for traditional vehicles.
The proposed change came as a surprise, some experts and industry officials said, because the government has never given any preferential treatment for hybrid technology. Previously, the government offered subsidies for, for instance, the purchase of all-electric cars.
Hybrid cars sold in China include versions of Toyota’s Corolla, Levin and Camry sedans, and versions of Honda’s Accord and CR-V. Beijing-based spokesmen for both Japanese automakers declined to comment.