Full of beans: Coffee grounds to help power London’s buses

Transport for London has been turning to biofuels to curb carbon emissions. (Shutterstock)
Updated 20 November 2017
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Full of beans: Coffee grounds to help power London’s buses

LONDON: Waste coffee grounds will be used to help fuel some of London’s buses, Royal Dutch Shell and clean technology company bio-bean said on Monday.
A new biofuel, which contains part coffee oil, is being added to the London bus fuel supply chain where it can be used without the need for modification, the companies said in a statement.
Bio-bean and partner Argent Energy have so far produced enough coffee oil to power one bus for a year, if used as a pure-blend for the 20 percent bio component and mixed with mineral diesel to form a B20 fuel, they said.
Transport for London has been turning to biofuels to curb carbon emissions, trialling a fuel made with used cooking oil from the catering industry, the transport operator said on its website.
Bio-bean said the average Londoner drinks 2.3 cups of coffee a day, producing over 200,000 tons of waste a year. It collects waste grounds from high street chains and factories, which are dried and processed to extract coffee oil.
“It’s a great example of what can be done when we start to reimagine waste as an untapped resource,” bio-bean founder Arthur Kay said.
The coffee fuel technology has been supported by Shell.


ISS astronaut drops in on Kraftwerk gig, plays duet from space

Updated 21 July 2018
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ISS astronaut drops in on Kraftwerk gig, plays duet from space

  • Video posted Saturday by the European Space Agency shows German astronaut Alexander Gerst “dropping in” for a live performance
  • Using a tablet computer with a virtual synthesizer, Gerst played a duet of Kraftwerk’s 1978 song “Spacelab”

BERLIN: Kraftwerk fans are used to hearing otherworldly tunes, but the German electronic music pioneers took it to another level at a gig in Stuttgart.
Video posted Saturday by the European Space Agency shows German astronaut Alexander Gerst “dropping in” for a live performance from the International Space Station.
Using a tablet computer with a virtual synthesizer, Gerst played a duet of Kraftwerk’s 1978 song “Spacelab” with the band Friday night to cheers from the audience.

He’s not the first space musician. Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield recorded a cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and played a duet with the Barenaked Ladies while 400 kilometers (250 miles) above the Earth in 2013.
American astronaut Ron McNair planned to play saxophone from orbit with Jean Michel Jarre in 1986 but died in the Challenger tragedy.