Honda to use Facebook to find owners with defective Takata airbags

Takata’s air bag inflators have been linked to at least 18 deaths and 180 injuries around the world. (Reuters)
Updated 20 November 2017
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Honda to use Facebook to find owners with defective Takata airbags

BENGALURU: Honda said on Monday it will use Facebook’s custom audiences tool to find car owners with defective Takata airbags.
The tool, which allows advertisers to reach a specified list of users, will match encrypted email addresses associated with recalled vehicle identification numbers to Facebook users.
Japan’s Takata’s air bag inflators have been linked to at least 18 deaths and 180 injuries around the world because they can rupture and shoot metal fragments into vehicles.
Honda, whose vehicles account for 17 of the 18 deaths worldwide, has been by far the most aggressive in reaching out to affected customers.
A report issued on Friday by an independent monitor of the Takata recalls said more than 10 million US vehicles and 18.5 million faulty Takata air bag inflators remain unrepaired in the largest ever auto recall.
Automakers have recalled or expect to recall by 2019 about 125 million vehicles worldwide to replace air bag inflators, including more than 60 million in the US.


EU gives Nestle a thumbs down in Kit Kat finger row

Updated 19 April 2018
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EU gives Nestle a thumbs down in Kit Kat finger row

  • Nestle has been locked in a decade-long battle with US rival Mondelez, maker of Cadbury chocolate, over the four-fingered wafer biscuit, which was first sold in 1935.
  • The EU’s intellectual property office allowed Nestle in 2006 to trademark what the court calls the “three-dimensional shape of the ‘Kit Kat 4 fingers’ product.”

Luxembourg: The European Union’s top court should cancel Swiss food giant Nestle’s trademark for the shape of the Kit Kat chocolate bar, the court’s top adviser said Thursday.
Nestle has been locked in a decade-long battle with US rival Mondelez, maker of Cadbury chocolate, over the four-fingered wafer biscuit, which was first sold in 1935.
The EU’s intellectual property office allowed Nestle in 2006 to trademark what the court calls the “three-dimensional shape of the ‘Kit Kat 4 fingers’ product.”
Advocate General Melchior Wathelet said the European Court of Justice (ECJ) should dismiss an appeal by Nestle against a lower court’s 2016 decision to annul the trademark.
“Nestle did not adduce sufficient evidence to show that its trademark had acquired distinctive character,” Wathelet said.
He said the intellectual property office should now “re-examine” its decision.
The Luxembourg-based ECJ often, but not always, follows the advice of the advocate general, its senior legal adviser, when making its final judgment.
The food giant specifically failed to show that the Kit Kat shape was well enough known in Belgium, Ireland, Greece, Luxembourg and Portugal, relying instead on market data from other countries, he said.
The official also said the EU court should reject an appeal by Mondelez against part of the judgment, saying it was “manifestly inadmissible.”
Nestle has already lost a legal bid in Britain — currently an EU member state but set to leave next year — to trademark the Kit Kat shape.