Asian Football Confederation to investigate laser claim

A laser appears to have been shone in the face of the Urawa Reds keeper. (Sponichi)
Updated 22 November 2017
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Asian Football Confederation to investigate laser claim

LONDON: The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is investigating claims that someone in the crowd at the first leg of the AFC Champions League final in Riyadh on Saturday shone a laser beam into the eyes of the Urawa Reds goalkeeper.
Images in the Tokyo media seemed to confirm the presence of a green light on Shusaku Nishikawa’s face during the game with Al-Hilal at the King Fahd International Stadium that ended 1-1.
“I knew it was a laser,” Nishikawa told Japanese sports newspaper Sports Nippon. “I got it in the first half and also during a free-kick in the second half.”
Nishikawa had an impressive game in goal, saving a number of times to ensure Urawa head into the second leg with a slight advantage of a draw and an away goal. He admitted that the laser made his job more difficult.
“When it was shone directly in my eyes then my view was a little blurred but I kind of expected it as this game was played in the Middle East,” Nishikawa said, adding that he had experienced a similar incident when on national team duty against Syria in Oman during qualification for the 2018 World Cup.
Players from Australia, Japan and South Korea have complained of receiving similar treatment when playing in West Asia in recent years, especially on international duty during important World Cup qualification games.
Clubs and national teams can be held responsible for improper conduct of spectators as detailed in the AFC’s 2017 Disciplinary and Ethics Code. In March 2017, Iran’s Esteghlal were fined $51,000 by the AFC after fans pointed lasers in the direction of players from Qatari club Al-Sadd in the AFC Champions League.
Esteghlal were also told that further offenses would result in a future home game being played behind closed doors.
“The AFC is aware of the reports and are looking into the matter,” a spokesperson for the confederation told Arab News when asked about the incident on Saturday.
Urawa have also informed the AFC of alleged racial abuse of their players on social media.
“Some Urawa Reds players including Rafael Silva and Mauricio de Carvalho Antonio have recently received discriminatory comments on their Instagram accounts,” read a statement on the club website. “Rafael released a message stating that he is saddened by the fact that racists still exist in this world and that he is proud of his skin color. Following this, Urawa Reds reported the incident to the AFC. We protect our players who are members of the Urawa Reds family from any discrimination.”
The second leg of the final takes place in Saitama on Saturday.
“We will have a very important match ahead of us ... in which Urawa Reds will battle for the crown of victory for the ACL after 10 years,” added the club statement. “We would like to ask our fans and supporters to fight together with us so that we can win the title without being distracted by the incidents happening outside the pitch.”


Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”