Pink, Calvin Harris and J. Cole set to take the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix stage by storm

DJ Calvin Harris, hit-maker behind anthem “Feels,” is set to take to the stage on Thursday night as the first major act at this year’s event.
Updated 26 November 2017
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Pink, Calvin Harris and J. Cole set to take the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix stage by storm

DUBAI: Pop fans across the region are set for a treat this weekend as the Formula 1 Etihad Abu Dhabi Grand Prix offers a line-up of international stars during its after-race concerts series, from Nov. 23-26.

DJ Calvin Harris, hit-maker behind anthem “Feels,” is set to take to the stage on Thursday night as the first major act at this year’s event. The Grammy Award-winning record producer currently has more than five billion streams across all major streaming services and 11 consecutive platinum singles.

F1-goers can expect to dance along to singles such as “This is What You Came For”, “How Deep is Your Love” and “Summer.”

Superstar singer Pink is set to headline the final night of festivities on Sunday with her well-known anthems, including “Get the Party Started,” “So What” and “Try.” Since her debut in 2000, the 37-year-old star has had seven smash hit records and 15 singles in the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts.

Sandwiched in between is Grammy Award-nominated hip-hop producer and rapper J. Cole, who has performed to crowds in the UAE before, and will bring his unique sound to the stage.

UK-based alternative rock band Mumford & Sons is also set to perform with their sing-along hits “Believe,” “I Will Wait” and “Little Lion Man.”

The concert series will take place at the Yas Marina Circuit and all race viewing tickets include access to the post-race concerts for the relevant day.


Massive diamond cache detected beneath Earth’s surface

Updated 18 July 2018
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Massive diamond cache detected beneath Earth’s surface

  • “This shows that diamond is not perhaps this exotic mineral..."
  • These naturally occurring precious minerals are located far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached

WASHINGTON: There’s a load of bling buried in the Earth.
More than a quadrillion tons of diamonds to be exact — or one thousand times more than one trillion — US researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology reported this week.
But don’t expect a diamond rush. These naturally occurring precious minerals are located far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached, about 90 to 150 miles (145 to 240 kilometers) below the surface of our planet.
“We can’t get at them, but still, there is much more diamond there than we have ever thought before,” said Ulrich Faul, a research scientist in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences.
“This shows that diamond is not perhaps this exotic mineral, but on the scale of things, it’s relatively common.”
Using seismic technology to analyze how sound waves pass through the Earth, scientists detected the treasure trove in rocks called cratonic roots, which are shaped like inverted mountains that stretch through the Earth’s crust and into the mantle.
These are “the oldest and most immovable sections of rock that lie beneath the center of most continental tectonic plates,” explained MIT in a statement.
The project to uncover deep Earth diamonds began because scientists were puzzled by observations that sound waves would speed up significantly when passing through the roots of ancient cratons.
So they assembled virtual rocks, made from various combinations of minerals, to calculate how fast sound waves would travel through them.
“Diamond in many ways is special,” Faul said.
“One of its special properties is, the sound velocity in diamond is more than twice as fast as in the dominant mineral in upper mantle rocks, olivine.”
They found that the only type of rock that matched the speeds they were detecting in craton would contain one to two percent diamond.
Scientists now believe the Earth’s ancient underground rocks contain at least 1,000 times more diamond than previously expected.
Still, very few of these gems are expected to make their way to the jewelry store.
Diamonds are made from carbon, and are formed under high-pressure and extreme temperatures deep in the Earth.
They emerge near the surface only through volcanic eruptions that occur rarely — on the order of every few tens of millions of years.