‘Autonomous driving? We’ve had chauffeur-driven vehicles for years’

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Giles Taylor
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The interior of the Rolls-Royce Phantom VIII
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Reveal of the Phantom VIII in Dubai by CEO Torsten Muller-Otvos
Updated 25 November 2017
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‘Autonomous driving? We’ve had chauffeur-driven vehicles for years’

LUCERNE: Giles Taylor has worked on projects such as the Phantom VIII since he became director of design at
Rolls-Royce in 2012. In an exclusive interview with Arab News, Taylor explained the challenges of designing the Phantom VIII, which he says combines “handmade ingenuity” and the latest technology, and Rolls-Royce’s approach to innovation.

Q: What kind of challenges have there been during the design of the Phantom VIII?

A: There was no brief written down; the only brief was another Phantom. The objective was to design a masterpiece and the challenge was how to balance classicism with modernity and keep that sense of timelessness. We needed to understand the historical foundation and then reinterpret it for the future.

Q: How long did the Phantom VIII project take from start to finish?

A: About five years and six months.

Q: I noticed the use of feathers and perishable materials in the Phantom’s “gallery” (the glass-covered art space on the dashboard). How can these fragile materials last?

A: The feathers have been age-accelerated and treated by heat and ultraviolet lights that simulate three years of service. Then we shake them so that the microfibers come free. They become less shiny but they will not disintegrate under hot or humid conditions.

Q: How far along is the production process and when will the Phantom VIII arrive in the markets?

A: We have started production and I think deliveries will start in 2018. Some customers will get their Phantoms in December this year.

Q: Have you received commissions for artworks in Phantom galleries?

A: Yes, we have. The time for delivery for commissioned pieces is going to be about six to eight months. It is similar to bespoke orders, which take about three more months to deliver.

Q: Do galleries come as part of standard specifications or bespoke department orders?
A: They will be offered as an option. So at the moment basic cars come with a lovely silk fabric, which is the standard pattern. Customers can have metal or wood versions or silk. There are five basic galleries that customers can order and they are all beautiful objets d’art.

Q: Where do you get the inspiration and skills needed for these projects?

A: The team we have in Goodwood comes from many disciplines such as textiles, the fashion industry and metalwork. We also have access to craft fairs and other events around the world. It all centers on handmade ingenuity. It is somehow similar to handmade watches. People love these objects and want them; they will pay big money for them.

Q: How do you see modern technology and advances in the industry?

A: It is a genuine opportunity for me. In the context of Rolls-Royce we have had autonomous driving for many years because we have chauffeur-driven vehicles. We also focus on convenience technology in terms of connectivity to social media and personal music. A Rolls-Royce also provides a suitable atmosphere to conduct business on long journeys. As far as electric cars go, they are coming and we are ready for them. The platform of the Phantom VIII is electrifiable. We have a date in the diary for an all-electric Rolls-Royce — and it is within 10 years.

Q: What is next in the pipeline from Rolls-Royce?

A: In July next year we have the high car (the Cullinan SUV vehicle). In the first half of 2018, the car will come to the Middle East and people can order it in VIP private viewings. It will be driven by the media in the summer of next year. On the horizon there is going to be a new Ghost, new Wraith and a new Dawn.

Q: In interior design, is attention given to the back seats more than the front seats?

A: Back seats are very important and we spend more time putting great features there — some for the first time. Back seats provide a cosseted and calm place with entertainment screens, controls within reach and access to drinks.

Q: In the region, VIPs hate to wait long times for deliveries, do you have any advice on how to avoid this?

A: From a design point of view we will embed more bespoke choices in the showrooms so more options can be offered from the outset. With a video link between showrooms and the studios at Goodwood, we can make the process much faster.

Q: Is it true that there will be no other versions of the Phantom VIII such as a drophead or a coupe?

A: There are no plans at the moment for other versions of the Phantom VIII. In the future there may be commissioned versions or special collections but nothing is firm at this stage.


Tesla production leader Doug Field exits company

Tesla produced 5,000 of its Model 3 cars, along with a combined total of 2,000 Model S and Model X vehicles. (AP)
Updated 03 July 2018
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Tesla production leader Doug Field exits company

SAN FRANCISCO: Tesla on Monday confirmed that the head of Model 3 production, who went on leave after chief executive Elon Musk took over his duties, will not be returning.
The departure of engineering senior vice president Doug Field came as California-based Tesla appeared to have finally hit a self-imposed goal of cranking out 5,000 Model 3 electric cars in a week.
Tesla co-founder Musk fired off a Twitter post over the weekend saying “7,000 cars, 7 days.”
In a note to investors on Monday, Analyst Trip Chowdhry of Global Equities said that in the preceding week, Tesla produced 5,000 of its Model 3 cars, along with a combined total of 2,000 Model S and Model X vehicles.
Tesla has been under pressure to increase production to show it can operate profitably and at the kind of scale needed to be considered a major auto company.
Musk has been managing the Tesla production line, which has been rejiggered to pump out cars faster.
Field will not be returning to the company, according to Tesla.
“After almost five years at Tesla, Doug Field is moving on,” a company spokesman told AFP.
“We’d like to thank Doug for his hard work over the years and for everything he has done for Tesla.”
Tesla announced in June that it was cutting nine percent of its workforce to enhance profitability, but said the move would not affect an ambitious production ramp-up of its Model 3 sedan.
The job cuts are part of a company-wide restructuring to address excess staff in some areas due to the company’s speedy growth, Musk said in an email to employees.
The cuts concern salaried staff but not production workers and will not affect Model 3 output targets, said Musk, who characterized the downsizing as an acknowledgement of the need to focus more on costs.
“Given that Tesla has never made an annual profit in the almost 15 years since we have existed, profit is obviously not what motivates us,” Musk said in the message.
“What drives us is our mission to accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable, clean energy, but we will never achieve that mission unless we eventually demonstrate that we can be sustainably profitable.”
Shares of Tesla closed the formal trading day down 2.3 percent to $335.07 but regained some of that ground in after-market trades.