Iraq's November oil exports from south increase

A worker at the Rumaila oil field in Basra. Southern exports are on the rise as Iraq looks to offset the halting of exports from its Kirkuk oilfields in the north. (Reuters)
Updated 01 December 2017
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Iraq's November oil exports from south increase

BASRA: Oil exports from Iraq’s southern ports rose to an average of 3.5 million barrels per day (bpd) in November from 3.35 million bpd in October, Basra Oil Company Director General Ihsan Abdul Jabbar told Reuters on Friday.
Southern exports are on the rise as Iraq looks to offset the halting of exports from its Kirkuk oilfields in the north in mid-October after Baghdad government forces dislodged Kurdish Peshmerga fighters from the area.
A southern export figure of 3.9 million bpd released by the oil ministry on Thursday, the highest ever, referred just to output on Nov. 29, Abdul Jabbar said.
“The November average was 3.5 million bpd,” he said.
The Iraqi government’s November revenues from oil exports were over $6 billion, an oil ministry spokesman later said in a statement, with a total of over 105 million barrels sold.
The average price per barrel sold was $57.194, the spokesman said.
Southern exports are shipped by state-owned Basra Oil and sold by state oil marketer SOMO on behalf of the central government.
SOMO is also in charge of selling crude from Kirkuk but there were no exports from there in October or November, the oil ministry said.
The Kurdistan Regional Government in northern Iraq sells crude from its own fields through a pipeline to the Turkish Mediterranean port of Ceyhan.
Iraq is OPEC’s second-largest producer after Saudi Arabia with an output capacity of 4.8 million bpd which Baghdad aims to increase to 5 million bpd.
Actual production is less than 4.5 million bpd in line with an agreement among oil exporting nations to curb output in order to support crude prices and reduce global oil inventories.


Gulf countries strengthen oil coordination amid tensions: Kuwait

Updated 20 May 2019
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Gulf countries strengthen oil coordination amid tensions: Kuwait

  • ‘It is normal amid this escalation that Kuwait and the Gulf Cooperation Council countries take these steps’
  • Kuwait was in ‘constant contact’ with its ally, the US

KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait’s deputy foreign minister said countries in the Gulf have strengthened coordination to provide oil to global markets amid increased regional tensions.
“It is normal amid this escalation that Kuwait and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries take these steps,” Khalid Al-Jarallah told reporters late Sunday on the sidelines of a Ramadan sit-down organized by the Iraqi embassy.
“There is cooperation and coordination between Kuwait and the Gulf countries to provide guarantees for oil tankers and continuous supply of energy to global markets.”
Jarallah’s comments come days after sabotage attacks against tankers in highly sensitive Gulf waters and the bombing of a Saudi pipeline — the latter claimed by Iran-aligned Yemeni rebels.
Both attacks targeted routes built as alternatives to the Strait of Hormuz, the conduit for almost all Gulf exports.
The US Fifth Fleet headquartered in Bahrain said the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council began “enhanced security patrols” Saturday in international waters, in “tight coordination with the US navy.”
Iran has repeatedly threatened to close the strait in case of war with the United States, which earlier this month announced it was sending an aircraft carrier and strike group to the region.
Kuwait’s deputy foreign minister said “tension was escalating quickly” but he remained hopeful.
He added Kuwait was in “constant contact” with its ally, the US.
On Saturday, OPEC giant Saudi Arabia called for urgent meetings of the GCC and the Arab League to discuss recent “aggressions and their consequences” in the region.
The two summits are scheduled to be held in Makkah on May 30.
Jarallah welcomed the kingdom’s invitation, saying Kuwait was keen to take part in discussions on issues “potentially dangerous” to the region.