Saudi crown prince tops Time Person of the Year readers’ poll

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, pictured here in November, is spearheading a raft of political and economic reforms in Saudi Arabia. (SPA)
Updated 06 December 2017
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Saudi crown prince tops Time Person of the Year readers’ poll

LONDON: Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is leading Time magazine’s people’s poll for its “Person of the Year 2017” award.
The famous poll — which has been published on an annual basis for 90 years — awards a chosen person who has had “the most influence over the news in the last 12 months.”
By lunchtime on Monday, Crown Prince Mohammed had clinched 24 percent of the “people’s vote,” ahead of the magazine’s deadline for submissions by the end of Dec. 4. The official Time Person of the Year will be announced on Dec. 6.
Crown Prince Mohammed has racked up global headlines this year as he spearheads political and economic reform in Saudi Arabia.
Key reforms in Saudi Arabia have included the move to allow women to drive, plans to sell a stake in national oil giant Aramco, restricting the powers of the religious police and a clampdown on corruption that has seen many royals and business people detained.
By securing almost a quarter of the vote, Crown Prince Mohammed is currently 18 percentage points ahead of the nearest contender, the #MeToo campaign, which highlighted sexual harassment cases globally.
Time editors drew up the shortlist of 33 people from diverse fields of activities across the world.
Ultimately the magazine’s editors have the final say in who is deemed Person of the Year — but the reader plays an important role and provides editors with “a window into who the reader thinks most shaped 2017,” according to the magazine.
The Time Person of the Year award has previously honored luminaries including Yasser Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin (1993), Gandhi (1930) and Winston Churchill (1940, 1949).
It has also previously seen some controversial choices of winner, such as Joseph Stalin (1942) and Ayatollah Khomeini (1979).
Former US President Barack Obama, who has been included in the shortlist 11 times, is the person who has been cited most often, and was named Person of the Year in both 2008 and 2012.


Bulgaria indicts suspect in journalist killing

Updated 19 October 2018
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Bulgaria indicts suspect in journalist killing

  • ‘Yes, I am guilty. I am sorry, I can’t believe I did this’
  • The 30-year-old TV presenter was found near a jogging path along the Danube in Ruse on October 6

SOFIA: Bulgarian prosecutors on Friday indicted a man accused of the rape and murder of a television journalist and the court hearing the case ordered him to remain in custody pending trial.
Severin Krasimirov, 20, was handcuffed and under heavy guard when he appeared before the regional court in the northern town of Ruse.
He told journalists that he had approached journalist Viktoria Marinova and hit her in the face.
“Yes, I am guilty. I am sorry, I can’t believe I did this,” he said.
Prosecutors called for him to be tried for Marinova’s rape and murder.
According to media reports, he had already admitted that to police in Germany where he was arrested.
But he said he had not known that Marinova had died and denied raping her.
If convicted, Krasimirov faces a jail sentence of 10-20 years for the rape and a possible life sentence for the murder.
The body of the 30-year-old television presenter was found near a jogging path along the Danube in Ruse on October 6.
Authorities said she died from blows to the head and suffocation, and that she was raped after her death.
The case shocked Bulgaria and drew strong international condemnation as observers suspected a possible connection between the crime and Marinova’s work.
However, investigators found no evidence to support this theory.
They said the crime appeared to be “a spontaneous attack.”
Ruse prosecutor Kremena Kolitsova told the court that evidence and medical expertise showed the journalist had been punched seven times in the face and the resulting nasal fracture led to her suffocation.
Investigators said Marinova’s blood had also been found on Krasimirov’s clothes.
The prosecutor said the suspect should remain under arrest because of the risk of flight.
Krasimirov was arrested in the German town of Stade, near the northern city of Hamburg, on October 9, after leaving Bulgaria by car on the day after the killing.