Saudi version of Takeshi’s Castle coming to Riyadh in 10 months

The president of General Sports Authority (GSA), Turki Al-Sheikh, with Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) Chairman Toshi Shika Ishihara after signing the agreement. (AN photo)
Updated 05 December 2017

Saudi version of Takeshi’s Castle coming to Riyadh in 10 months

JEDDAH: The president of General Sports Authority (GSA), Turki Al-Sheikh, announced on Nov. 24 in Tokyo an agreement with Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) Chairman Toshi Shika Ishihara to build a replica of the famous “Takeshi Castle” in Riyadh.
Al-Sheikh tweeted: “I was pleased to sign — a few minutes ago — in Tokyo an agreement with TBS, to establish Takeshi’s Castle in the Kingdom. The beginning will be in the last quarter of 2018.”
This is the first entertainment project announced by the GSA, and reflects a will to attract public attention toward sports activities.
According to GSA’s Twitter account, Al-Sheikh said: “We seek not only to entertain, but also to inspire people to exercise and experience new physical activities.”
The building of the castle will show Arab architectural elements on an area of 300,000 square meters. As the original version, it will include 50 obstacles, some specially designed for this project.
The Japanese show had a large following in Saudi Arabia and neighboring Arab countries during the mid to late 1980s. It was locally called “Al-Hisin” (The Fort), and the commentary was provided in Arabic by Lebanese television personality Riad Sharara and Palestinian news broadcaster Jamal Rayyan.
The original show was dubbed in many languages around the world, and it has a special place in the memory of Saudis and Arabs.
Saudis welcomed the GSA initiative to diversify its activities. Khalid said on Twitter: “When I was 15 I wanted to participate with the Japanese players; now I’m 45 and I still have the will to prepare myself and participate.”
Badriah commented on Twitter saying: “What I like about this idea is that it contains both entertainment, and physical activity, as well as the use of heritage in an innovative way, that is creative.”
Tokyo Broadcasting System was launched in the early 50s, one of their most important projects was TBS Television, which has created countless hit drama, shows, and news programs that played an important role in promoting Japanese culture around the world.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.