#ThisHappened in 2017: Twitter shares the top moments of the past year

Twitter is looking back at the main events of 2017 according to what people tweeted, retweeted and shared (Shutterstock)
Updated 05 December 2017
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#ThisHappened in 2017: Twitter shares the top moments of the past year

As we reach the end of 2017 Twitter has been reflecting on the year that was: from breaking news, entertainment, sports, and local conversations, if it happened anywhere, it happened on Twitter.

Early this year, Twitter launched its Moments guide in Arabic that enables people to discover new content by displaying curated “Moments,” a feature that creates a moment based on a collection of tweets. Located in Twitter’s “Explore” tab, this tool features moments from around the world and regionally on topics that include news, sports and entertainment, that are also tweeted from @MomentsMENA.

One of the key highlights that made 2017 unique was when Twitter’s Co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey (@jack) Tweeted Arabic Eid wishes for the first time to celebrate Eid Al Adha:
Take a look at how 2017 unfolded on Twitter, and share your biggest moments and memories of 2017 with #ThisHappened:

Saudi Arabia’s most tweeted moments

In 2017, the most retweeted tweets in Saudi Arabia were from King Salman @KingSalman; the top tweet being when he tweeted the celebration of Saudi Arabia’s national day. This message also falls under the top 100 global retweets. The second was when the king tweeted his wishes for the Saudi people on the occasion of Eid Al Fitr:
Another top tweet in Saudi Arabia in 2017 was by football player @fahad_almowalad who posted his congratulations when the Kingdom’s national team qualified for the 2018 World Cup:
Saudi Arabia’s top trends

Following Saudi Arabia’s announcement that women were to be allowed to drive in the country, people both locally and globally took to Twitter to air their views on the topic, generating over 2 million tweets within the week:

The region also witnessed the launch of the “Retweets Challenge.”

Carter Wilkerson’s (@carterjwm) call for a year’s supply of free nuggets from @Wendys was heard around the globe, and became the most retweeted tweet with 3.6 million Retweets, surpassing Ellen’s infamous selfie that she took at the Oscars in 2014, as the most retweeted tweet of all time.

The trend continued and spread across the MENA region, where Saudi National, AbdulAziz (@Mr_Abdul3ziz) tweeted to a well-known fast food chain (@ShawarmerSA) asking how many retweets it would take for the chain to donate 100 Shawarma sandwiches to underprivileged workers – that post request eventually spread to other brands:
 
Below are some of the top trending topics that generated popular hashtags in the Kingdom:

Top Hajj tweets:
 

Top sports hashtags:
1. الهلال# (Al Hilal football club)
2. النصر# (Al Nassr football club)
3. الاهلي# (Al Ahli football club)
4. الاتحاد# (Al Ittihad football club)
5. الشباب# (Al Shabab football club)

Top athletes accounts:
1. @Faisalbinturki1 (Faisal Bin Turki, Chairman of Al Nassr football club)
2. @omaralsomah (Omar Al Somah, Al Ahli football player)
3. @YASSER_Q_Y20 (Yasser AL Qahtani, Al Hilal football player)
4. @AliAlhabsi (Ali Al Habsi, Al Hilal Goalkeeper)
5. @mohadalowais (Mohammad Al Owais, Al Ahli goalkeeper)

Prominent new joiners:
The following list also falls under the top 200 global accounts that were created on Twitter in 2017:
1. @khrbinomar77 (Omar Khribin, Al Hilal football player)
2. @S_AlNeayma (Saleh AlNeayma, Former captain of the Saudi national football team)
3. @nasser_shamrni (Nasser Al Shamrani, Al Shabab Club football player)
4. @AwwadSAlawwad (H.E. Awwad Bin Saleh Al Awwad, Minister of Culture and Information)
5. @HolyKaaba (Official Al-ka`bah Al-musharrafah account)

Top entertainment accounts:
1. @Fayez_malki (Fayez Malki, Saudi actor)
2. @Mjeedalfawzan (Abdul Mjeed Al Fawzan, Saudi musician)
3. @algassabinasser (Nasser Al Ghassabi, Saudi actor)
4. @fawaz_dr (Fawaz Al Laboon, Saudi poet)
5. @AhlamAlShamsi (Ahlam Al Shamsi, Emirati musician)


Facebook suspends Boston analytics firm over data usage

In this Oct. 15, 2013, file photo, Chuck Goolsbee, site director for Facebook's Prineville data centers, shows the computer servers that store users' photos and other data, at the Facebook site in Prineville, Ore. (AP)
Updated 21 July 2018
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Facebook suspends Boston analytics firm over data usage

  • Facebook said Friday that Crimson Hexagon is cooperating and that so far its investigation hasn’t found evidence that the firm obtained Facebook or Instagram information inappropriately

NEW YORK: Facebook said Friday that it has suspended Boston-based analytics firm Crimson Hexagon while it investigates how it collects and shares Facebook and Instagram’s user data.
Facebook has been facing increased scrutiny over how third-party firms use its data since news broke in March that data firm Cambridge Analytica improperly accessed user data.
The Wall Street Journal first reported that Facebook had suspended Crimson Hexagon. The newspaper says among the firm’s clients is a Russian nonprofit with ties to the Kremlin.
“We don’t allow developers to build surveillance tools using information from Facebook or Instagram,” said Ime Archibong, Facebook’s vice president of product partnerships. “We take these allegations seriously, and we have suspended these apps while we investigate.”
Facebook said Friday that Crimson Hexagon is cooperating and that so far its investigation hasn’t found evidence that the firm obtained Facebook or Instagram information inappropriately.
Crimson Hexagon says on its website it has access to over one trillion consumer conversations from social media, forums, blogs and reviews.
In a blog posting , Crimson Hexagon Chief Technology Officer Chris Bingham said the company “abides completely” by the rules social media sites including Twitter and Facebook put in place to limit the ways third-party companies can use their data.
He said the firm only collects publicly available social media data. He contrasted that with Cambridge Analytica’s use of private user data.
Users of Crimson Hexagon’s platform, which include government customers, analyze the data to understand large-scale consumer trends and preferences, Bingham wrote.
“Government entities that leverage the Crimson Hexagon platform do so for the same reasons as many of our other non-government customers: a broad-based and aggregate understanding of the public’s perception, preferences and sentiment about matters of concern to them,” he wrote.