Beauty really is skin deep for almost half of Saudi men

For most Saudi women, personality is priority.
Updated 07 December 2017
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Beauty really is skin deep for almost half of Saudi men

LONDON: Nearly half of all Saudi men believe that good looks are more important than personality in a romantic partner, according to a new poll conducted by YouGov.
Just 52 percent of male Saudi respondents said that having an agreeable personality is more important than physical attractiveness, whereas 65 percent of Saudi women reportedly ranked personality as their first or second priority in a romantic partner.  
The YouGov Omnibus study, which surveyed YouGov panelists across 20 different countries, asked respondents whether they ranked personality or good looks as more important when considering what they look for in a romantic partner. 
Of the 20 nationalities polled, Saudi men and women expressed the greatest difference of opinion on the subject of physical attractiveness, according to a YouGov press release. 
Egyptian men and women also revealed vastly different priorities in searching for a partner, with around 83 percent of women saying personality was more important than looks, but only 55 percent of Egyptian men agreeing. 
A pretty face, however, is apparently less important to men in the UAE. Just 37 percent of men in the Emirates said that beauty outweighed other considerations in their romantic calculus. 
Women in Saudi Arabia and France were of similar minds when ranking physical appearance and personality: About eight out of ten women in both countries would chose a good hearted mate over a strong jaw line, the press release revealed.
Women in the Kingdom are not searching for thick wallets, either, it seems. Some 59 percent of Saudi female respondents said that salary size was among the last things they look for in a partner. 
The YouGov poll comes at a time when Saudi women are demanding — and receiving — more rights and are entering the workforce in larger numbers. 
Among men, Vietnam was the only country where good looks were considered to outshine personality, with 46 percent of Vietnamese men ranking personality as more important.
Nordic women were the most likely to choose personality over good looks, globally.


Royals Harry and Meghan go barefoot on Bondi

Despite morning fog, the pair met local surfers enjoying winter swells. (AP)
Updated 19 October 2018
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Royals Harry and Meghan go barefoot on Bondi

  • Pre-prepared signs screaming “G’day Harry and Meghan” greeted the royal couple

SYDNEY: British royals Harry and Meghan kicked off their shoes and donned tropical garlands Friday, as they hit Sydney’s famed Bondi beach for the latest stop on their Australian tour.
Expectant Meghan donned a summer dress, putting aside her high heels, while Harry ditched his usual suit for chinos as the couple lapped up cheers from Australian fans and enjoyed Bondi’s surf.
Despite morning fog, the pair met local surfers enjoying winter swells and sat down on the sand for a long chat with leaders of the OneWave group, which focuses on helping people improve mental health by getting outdoors.
Pre-prepared signs screaming “G’day Harry and Meghan” greeted the royal couple, who have received a warm welcome from fans throughout the start of their 16-day pacific tour.
While half of Australians oppose having British monarchs as head of state, and the vast majority of Australians have carried on with business as usual during the visit, there has been sizable support for the celebrity couple at every stop.
News that the Duchess of Sussex is pregnant has only made the crowds swell.
Amid a torrent of fawning press coverage declaring Meghan the “Queen of hugs” and the prince receiving “buckets of love,” the Australian Republican Movement is putting on a brave face.
“The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are very welcome visitors” the group said at the start of the trip, pointedly adding that “Australians of all ages know the difference between this wonderful event and the questions of our nation’s identity and future.”
In a 1999 referendum, 55 percent of Australians voted against replacing Queen Elizabeth II as head of state, although polls indicate support for republicanism has grown since then.
The opposition Labor party has promised a plebiscite on the issue if it wins a general election expected in 2019.