College student brings Hollywood stars to tears at breakfast

Angelina Jolie speaks at The Hollywood Reporter’s 2017 Women In Entertainment Breakfast in Los Angeles, California. (AFP)
Updated 08 December 2017
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College student brings Hollywood stars to tears at breakfast

LOS ANGELES: It was not Angelina Jolie or Jennifer Lawrence who got the most rousing applause at the Hollywood Reporter’s annual Women in Entertainment breakfast on Wednesday. It was a college freshman named Carla Arellano.
The Loyola Marymount University student received a standing ovation and brought a room of Hollywood heavyweights to tears as she accepted a full-ride scholarship.
“All I can think about right now are all the papers I have to write for my finals,” Arellano said, alternately laughing and crying.
The 26th annual Women in Entertainment breakfast celebrating the trade publication’s yearly Power 100 ranking of women in the entertainment business included presentations of $1 million in college scholarships to girls from underrepresented communities in Los Angeles.
Arellano thanked her parents and her mentors through tears before closing with a quote from Frida Kahlo, which she recited in Spanish and English.
“Feet, what do I need you for, when I have wings to fly?” she said.
Her emotional speech left presenter Justin Timberlake teary eyed, along with A-list guests including Shonda Rhimes, Emmy Rossum, Bryce Dallas Howard and Glenn Close.
“This is maybe the most moving breakfast we’ve ever had,” said Sherry Lansing, who presented her namesake Leadership Award to Lawrence.
Jolie, who gave the keynote address, also spoke about the plight of women around the world, imploring guests at the breakfast to appreciate what it means to be artists who can express themselves.
“Art influences, it captures the imagination, it challenges orthodoxy,” Jolie said. “And societies where women are denied freedom of expression, those societies are being shaped without the voice and influence and wisdom of women. That is why I’m so grateful to be a part of this community.”
Other speakers included Rhimes, who served as guest editor for the Power 100 issue, and Sarah Silverman, who opened the program at Milk Studios.


Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

Dr. Bumbum. (Courtesy: Facebook)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

  • She was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died
  • Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out

RIO DE JANEIRO: A Brazilian celebrity butt-enhancement surgeon called Dr. Bumbum has gone on the run following the death of a patient just hours after undergoing cosmetic surgery at his home in Rio de Janeiro.
Denis Furtado was considered capable of performing magic on women’s bodies, in particular their bottoms, and became known throughout the country for his expertise.
The 45-year-old’s Instagram account reflects his popularity with 650,000 followers.
But now he is wanted by police after Lilian Quezia Calixto died just hours after a butt enlargement procedure at his home in the swanky Barra de Tijuca neighborhood.
Calixto had traveled 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) from her home in Cuiaba to see the surgeon to the stars.
But following the controversial injection of acrylic glass filler, Calixto started feeling ill.
Upon arriving at hospital on Sunday, she was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died.
Soon after, Furtado disappeared and is now wanted for homicide and criminal association, while his girlfriend, who some media claim was also his assistant, has been detained.
The news has caused shock waves throughout the industry — Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out.
The Brazilian Plastic Surgery Society (SBPC) was quick to denounce Furtado, saying “the growing invasion of non-specialists in the specialty has provoked more and more fatalities like this one.”
“You cannot perform plastic surgery inside an apartment. Many people are selling a dream, a fantasy to patients in an unethical way and people, weakened, are often attracted to low prices, without considering whether or not the conditions are adequate,” SBPC president Niveo Steffen told AFP.
Steffen said the injection of synthetic biopolymers or polymers, like acrylic glass, is very dangerous and has caused dozens of deaths among women in Latin America, especially in Venezuela.
He said Furtado’s case demonstrates the “trivialization of cosmetic procedures by unspecialized professionals, who often aren’t doctors and are putting people at risk.”
According to the G1 Internet site, Furtado has been charged by police four times for illegally practicing medicine and crimes against consumers.