Tite backs Egypt to shine at the World Cup

Egypt are highly fancied by Brazil’s boss. (AFP)
Updated 08 December 2017
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Tite backs Egypt to shine at the World Cup

MOSCOW: Ten years ago, long before he was preparing to lead Neymar and Co. on a journey to Russia in search of a sixth World Cup title, Adenor Leonardo Bacchi, or Tite as he is more popularly known, was coaching in the United Arab Emirates. Employed by Al-Ain to replace the outgoing Walter Zenga, he stayed in the Garden City for only six months before returning to Brazil, where he led Internacional to the Copa Sudamericana title. In 2010, he returned to the UAE, this time with Al-Wahda, but again stayed only half a season, returning home to take the reins at Corinthians. 
“Arab teams have a very strong European influence,” Tite said. “The basic system is with two lines of four and two attackers, one of them coming back to recompose the midfield. They are teams that compact well and occupy spaces intelligently to defend. In Al-Ain and Al-Wahda I learned to play with these two lines of four and two attackers because it is the predominant system with this European influence.”
His experience coaching in the Gulf may afford him a more astute view of football in the region, but it is unlikely to be required in Russia — Brazil and Saudi Arabia can only meet in the semi-finals. 
It’s a similar story with Egypt, who were also drawn in Group A alongside Arab neighbors Saudi Arabia. Tite faced Al-Ahly in 2012 when he led Corinthians to victory at the FIFA Club World Cup in Japan. His side won 1-0, but his overriding memory was of a solid, well-drilled outfit. “I knew more about Egyptian football in 2012 when I faced Al-Ahly,” he said. “They were a team that gave us a lot of difficulty. But the Egypt national team has evolved a lot, with some high-level professionals playing in Europe. They also have the tactical part very well crafted.”
 


France overpower Croatia 4-2 to win World Cup final

Updated 15 July 2018
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France overpower Croatia 4-2 to win World Cup final

  • France overwhelmed Croatia 4-2 in the World Cup final at Moscow’s Luzhniki stadium
  • Croatia fought hard for an hour but gradually ran out of steam after playing extra time in their three previous matches

MOSCOW: France overwhelmed Croatia 4-2 in the World Cup final at Moscow’s Luzhniki stadium on Sunday to lift the trophy for the second time in 20 years.
The French, playing their third World Cup final, were made to sweat initially and were lucky to go ahead when Croatia striker Mario Mandzukic headed an Antoine Griezmann free kick into his own net in the 18th minute, the first own goal in a World Cup final.
Ivan Perisic levelled with a powerful shot 10 minutes later but the Croatia midfielder was then penalized for handball following a VAR review and Griezmann stepped up coolly to convert the 38th-minute penalty and put France 2-1 up.
Croatia fought hard for an hour but gradually ran out of steam after playing extra time in their three previous matches, and goals from Paul Pogba and Kylian Mbappe gave France a three-goal cushion.
Mandzukic pounced on a mistake by France keeper Hugo Lloris to cut the deficit in the 69th minute, making it the highest-scoring final over 90 minutes in 60 years, but Croatia could not find the net again in their first World Cup final.