Saudi Arabia’s Al-Qatt Al-Asiri added to the UNESCO list

Modern Qatt is now practiced by using synthetic paint and bristles. (UNESCO photo)
Updated 08 December 2017
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Saudi Arabia’s Al-Qatt Al-Asiri added to the UNESCO list

JEDDAH: Al-Qatt Al-Asiri was on Wednesday added to the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.
Al-Qatt Al-Asiri is an art form deeply rooted within the identity of the southern region in the Kingdom, and practiced exclusively by women. It can be seen decorating the interior walls of guest rooms in Asiri homes.
Women draw geometric shapes and tribal symbols and paint them in vibrant colors to make their guests feel welcome. During the creative process, female relatives design masterpieces on the walls, bringing about a sense of solidarity between them.
The Saudi Heritage Preservation Society (SHPS), along with the Kingdom’s permanent UNESCO delegation, were participating in the 12th session of UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage on Jeju Island, South Korea, when the news broke.
“We filed Al-Qatt with UNESCO back in 2016 and we continued to strive to provide further information regarding its intricacies until it was inscribed during today’s session,” Rihaf Qasas, SHPS project manager, told Arab News.
“I wouldn’t describe it as a struggle; we just had to collect enough data and fill in the gaps, and we did it.
“This is so important because it keeps this traditional art that’s existed for ages from being buried. It ensures this culture is documented for generations to come, and it acquaints the world with the magnitude of the Kingdom’s heritage,” Qasas added.
On their future endeavors with UNESCO, Qasas said the SHPS could only register one file every two years. The Janadriyah festival will be registered next year, and the Kiswat Al-Ka’aba (the Holy Mosque’s cloth) in 2020.
The most distinguished practitioner of Al-Qatt Al-Asiri, Fatima Abou Gahas, dedicated her life to sustaining and teaching the art until her death in 2010.
 


Al-Ula Royal Commission launches second phase of university scholarship program

Updated 37 min 1 sec ago
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Al-Ula Royal Commission launches second phase of university scholarship program

  • High-quality education will make students ‘valuable assets’ in transformation of the region
JEDDAH: The Royal Commission for Al-Ula has launched the second phase of its overseas scholarship program, giving students the chance to study at universities in the US, UK, France and Australia.
The program is intended to broaden the horizons of Saudi students, creating more rounded graduates with wider experiences of foreign cultures and practices.
The students will also learn the languages of their host countries, which will aid them in later life depending on what path they choose, and encouraging interaction and exchanges between the Al-Ula region and the rest of the world.
Rami Al-Sakran, capabilities development manager for the commission, said the Al-Ula scholarship program was one of four strands in a community development plan.
“We have four different units, sector planning and business licensing so that covers economic development, with community engagement and human capability under the social development plan,” he told Arab News.
The second phase of the scholarship program will run for five years following the positive response to the first phase, which was launched last year. The second phase has been expanded to accommodate 300 students and is open to all genders.
Last September, 165 students were sent to the US, UK and France with Australia to focus on fields such as hospitality, tourism, agriculture, archaeology and heritage.
Many residents from the area had migrated to larger cities because of the lack of job opportunities, he said, so it was important to engage and employ locals first.
“We’ll flood the equation. We’ll see people coming in and our priority is the local community and to provide them with jobs. We want these jobs that we’ll create to be filled by the locals first.
“We’ve currently provided jobs, whether directly or indirectly, some of them temporary and others permanent. At Winter in Tantora, we have volunteers, ushers, drivers as this is seasonal but we’ve established a database and some jobs are permanent, whether they’re directly employed by our CEO or some contract.”
Al-Sakran said locals were key to the success of turning Al-Ula into a major tourist destination.
“Locals, locals, locals. Without the locals, we can’t succeed. We have a very transparent relationship, it’s a two-way street with them. We cooperate with them and communicate with them on every basis. We have a strong relationship with the governor of Al-Ula and we listen to the locals.
“Whether it was our social or economical development, as you can see Winter in Tantora has a major socio-economic impact on the area and ... the locals are working everywhere here and that’s what we want. It’s theirs. We’ll unveil it to the Kingdom ... that’s the idea, to make it a strong and significant destination for all.”