Trump’s Jerusalem decision could help militants — UAE’s Sheikh Mohammed

Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan (L), Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and UAE's deputy commander-in-chief of the armed forces attends a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, March 24, 2016. (REUTERS)
Updated 10 December 2017
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Trump’s Jerusalem decision could help militants — UAE’s Sheikh Mohammed

DUBAI: US President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital could provide a lifeline to militants after the setbacks they suffered this year, the de facto leader of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has warned.
Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahayan also said that the UAE hopes that Washington would reconsider its decision.
Trump’s announcement has sparked widespread opposition across the Middle East, with many warning it could affect Washington’s role as a Middle East peace broker.
“The US move could throw a lifebuoy to terrorist and armed groups, which have begun to lose ground in the region,” said Sheikh Mohammed, speaking to a delegation from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
The comments were carried in a report on state news agency WAM published late on Saturday.
Iraq on Saturday declared final victory over Daesh after Iraqi forces drove its last remnants from the country, while the group is on the back foot in neighboring Syria, where an offensive backed by Russia has driven the group out of most of its strongholds.
Palestinians want Arab East Jerusalem, captured by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war, to be the capital of a state they hope would be emerge from peace talks with Israel. Israel has annexed East Jerusalem in a move not recognized internationally and regards the area as part of its capital.
Sheikh Mohammed said Trump’s unilateral decision violates UN resolutions, and urged Washington to “reconsider its move and work basically in an effective and neutral manner to draft true principles for peace that serve all and realize development and stability in the region,” according to WAM.
Turning to Yemen, Sheikh Mohammed said the Saudi-led Arab coalition, which includes the UAE, remained committed to a political solution to end the war that began in 2015 when the Iran-aligned Houthis advanced on the southern port city of Aden forcing President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi to flee into exile.
But he said that any solution “will also not be at the expense of enabling a military militia that operates outside the state authority and posing a direct threat to the security and stability of the sisterly Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the region at large.”


Brother of 2017 Manchester bomber being extradited from Libya to Britain

Updated 36 min 28 sec ago
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Brother of 2017 Manchester bomber being extradited from Libya to Britain

  • Salman Abedi blew himself up at the end of a show by US singer Ariana Grande in 2017, killing 22 people
  • London requested the extradition of his brother Hashem after police issued an arrest warrant against him

TRIPOLI: The brother of a suicide bomber suspected of helping plan a 2017 attack on a concert in the British city of Manchester is being extradited from Libya, according to the force that was holding him in the Libyan capital Tripoli.
Salman Abedi, a 22-year-old Briton born to Libyan parents, blew himself up at the end of a show by US singer Ariana Grande in the deadliest militant attack in Britain for 12 years.
The blast killed 22 people and injured more than 500.
London requested the extradition of his brother Hashem after police issued an arrest warrant against him for murder, attempted murder and conspiracy to cause an explosion.
But Tripoli had long stalled on the request.
“I confirm to you that Hashem is now in the air on his way to the UK ... he is extradited in accordance with a court verdict,” said a spokesman for the Tripoli-based Special Deterrence Force (Rada), who asked not to be named because of the sensitivity of the case.
“We received an official letter from the head of the attorney general’s investigations department, telling us to extradite Hashem Abedi to UK authorities based on a verdict by Tripoli’s court of appeals.”
Rada, a counter-terrorism and anti-crime group aligned with the government in Tripoli, arrested Hashem shortly after the bombing on suspicion he had helped plan the attack.
Rada said at the time that Salman and Hashem flew together to Libya in April 2017, before Salman returned to Britain to carry out the attack at the Manchester Arena in May.