Fighting corruption is a must to achieve development goals, says Muslim World League chief

Mohammad bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa
Updated 11 December 2017
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Fighting corruption is a must to achieve development goals, says Muslim World League chief

JEDDAH: Referring to corruption as a “black hole” that hinders the development process of a nation, Dr. Mohammad bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa called for confronting this menace in all ways possible.
Al-Issa, who is a member of the Council of Senior Scholars and secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), was addressing an event organized by the Saudi Anti-Corruption Commission (Nazaha)to mark International Corruption Day.
He told the audience about the different meanings and kinds of corruption. Al-Issa described the extremists’ skewed interpretation of the religion as intellectual corruption.
“Corruption could also be moral,” he said, adding that financial corruption is often preceded by administrative corruption.
Al-Issa said our world is not programmed; it is a world of choice, test and free interaction. Hence, corruption is present and should be confronted in all ways possible.
He stressed the need to fight corruption to achieve development goals. “Fighting corruption represents a measure of development,” he said.
“That is why, there are competitiveness measures relating to many factors, many of which are related to fighting corruption, eliminating bureaucracy and enhancing transparency,” Al-Issa added.
He also referred to “compound corruption,” which involves practicing corruption and justifying it.
“There is a masked corruption, which involves calling corruption by other names, like tips, encouragement and special facilities, and the most dangerous type of corruption in this context is money laundering,” said the MWL official.
He noted that serious efforts in fighting corruption from the top had a positive impact on the. The Kingdom followed the way of the Prophet (peace be upon him) in fighting corruption at the top; for the Prophet (PBUH) said: “I swear by Allah that if Fatimah, the daughter of Muhammad, should steal, I would have her hand cut off.”
This sends a clear message that no one has immunity, Al-Issa said. “But if fighting corruption starts from the bottom, the elite may think they are immune.”
He stressed that only authorized bodies should talk about corruption cases based on evidence. Al-Issa also praised the Saudi authorities for their efforts in fighting corruption.


Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

Updated 18 June 2018
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Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

  • The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia
  • The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease

GENEVA: Outbreaks of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) killed 23 people in Saudi Arabia between Jan. 21 and May 31 this year, the World Health Organization said on Monday.
The deaths were among 75 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during the period, the WHO said, and take the total number of deaths from the disease to 790 since it was first diagnosed in humans in 2012.
The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia.
One outbreak in February hit a private hospital in Hafer Albatin region, where the patient passed the disease to three health workers. There was another cluster of six cases in a hospital in Riyadh in the same month, although no health care workers were infected.
Two other clusters affected households in Jeddah and Najran.
MERS-CoV is a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. It appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012, although it has been traced in camels, the source of the infection, back to at least 1983.
The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease.
But it kills one in three sufferers, and hospital workers are at risk unless extreme caution is taken to identify MERS sufferers early and to protect health care workers from infection via airborne droplets such as from coughs and sneezes.
Susceptible people should avoid contact with suspected cases and with camels, and anyone who has contact with animals should wash their hands before and afterwards, the WHO said. Everyone should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating undercooked meat.
Three MERS cases have been reported this year outside Saudi Arabia. Oman and the United Arab Emirates each reported a case, while in Malaysia a man fell ill after drinking unpasteurised camel milk during a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia.