Australian city of Melbourne to test terrorism alarm system

Melbourne (Shutterstock)
Updated 11 December 2017
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Australian city of Melbourne to test terrorism alarm system

MELBOURNE, Australia: Melbourne will test a terrorism alarm system this month after police thwarted two alleged plots targeting Christmas-New Year crowds and a lone driver killed six pedestrians in the last year in Australia’s second-largest city.
Victoria state Acting Police Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said Monday loudspeakers were being installed at over 90 sites across downtown Melbourne as part of an alarm system to be tested Dec. 28.
Police last month charged a man with preparing to commit a terrorist attack in Melbourne.
Four men are awaiting trial on terrorism charges after being arrested in December last year over a similar alleged plot.
A man has been charged with six counts of murder and 28 of attempted murder after allegedly driving a stolen car along a Melbourne pedestrian mall in January.


Afghan attack won’t change Kandahar security situation — US Defense chief Mattis

Updated 17 min 13 sec ago
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Afghan attack won’t change Kandahar security situation — US Defense chief Mattis

  • The Taliban have claimed responsibility for Thursday’s shooting in Kandahar
  • The attack killed anti-Taliban strongman and police chief General Abdul Raziq

SINGAPORE: US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Friday the killing of a top Afghan official would not fundamentally change the security situation in Kandahar province.
The Taliban have claimed responsibility for Thursday’s shooting in the restive southern province that killed anti-Taliban strongman and police chief, General Abdul Raziq.
At least two other people died during the attack inside a fortified government compound in Kandahar city that targeted a high-level security meeting.
The top commander for US and NATO forces, General Scott Miller, was also present but escaped injury.
Mattis said he did not see Raziq’s death as changing things on the ground in Kandahar.
“I’ve seen the officers around him. I’ve seen the maturation of the Afghan security forces,” Mattis told reporters on the sidelines of a security summit in Singapore.
“It’s a tragic loss of a patriot for Afghanistan. But I don’t see it having a long-term effect on our area.”
The Pentagon chief said it was too early to know if the assault would hamper turnout for parliamentary elections set for October 20.