ICC reports Jordan to UN Security Council for not arresting Sudan’s Bashir

This file photo taken on Sept. 22, 2017 shows Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir delivering a speech during a visit to the village of Bilel in South Darfur, near the Kalma camp for displaced people. Hilal, a former aide to President Omar Al-Bashir, was arrested in November 2017 by Sudan’s counter-insurgency forces near his hometown of Mustariaha in North Darfur state after fierce clashes that left several dead. (AFP/Ashraf Shazly)
Updated 11 December 2017
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ICC reports Jordan to UN Security Council for not arresting Sudan’s Bashir

AMSTERDAM: The International Criminal Court (ICC) said on Monday it would refer Jordan to the UN Security Council for failing to arrest Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir when he visited Amman in March.
The court issued arrest warrants for Bashir in 2009 and 2010 over his alleged role in war crimes including genocide in Sudan’s Darfur province. Jordan, as a member of the ICC, is obliged to carry out its arrest warrants.
Sudan is not a member of the Hague-based permanent international war crimes court, and the ICC therefore does not have automatic jurisdiction to investigate alleged war crimes there.
However, the UN Security Council referred the case to the international court in March 2005.
The Security Council has the power to impose sanctions for a failure to cooperate with the ICC, but has so far not acted on court referrals.
A diplomatic row broke out when Bashir visited South Africa in 2015 and Pretoria failed to arrest him.
South Africa’s government argued that doing so would have been a violation of the immunity Bashir enjoys as a head of state. That argument was rejected by South African courts as well as the ICC.
The ICC ultimately did not refer South Africa to the Security Council, however, saying it was not clear that doing so would have any effect.
Kenya and South Africa have threatened to withdraw from the ICC over perceived bias against African countries. Burundi, which is under ICC investigation, has actually withdrawn.
Bashir is accused by ICC prosecutors of five counts of crimes against humanity including murder, extermination, forcible transfer, torture and rape, as well as two counts of war crimes for attacking civilians and pillaging. He faces three counts of genocide allegedly committed against the Fur, Masalit and Zaghawa ethnic groups in Darfur, Sudan, from 2003 to 2008.


More Saudi sectors opened to foreign investment

The Cabinet amended the sectors excluded from foreign investment at the meeting chair by King Salman. (SPA)
Updated 24 October 2018
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More Saudi sectors opened to foreign investment

  • The amendment allows foreigners to invest in labor services and jobs, including recruitment offices; audio and video services; road transport services; and brokerage services for real estate

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia will allow foreigners to invest in audiovisual services, land transport and real-estate brokerages, the Cabinet decided on Tuesday.

The Cabinet amended what it described as types of activity that had been previously excluded from foreign investment, after concluding its weekly meeting chaired by King Salman.

The amendment allows foreigners to invest in labor services and jobs, including recruitment offices; audio and video services; road transport services; and brokerage services for real estate.

Meanwhile, about 320 foreign institutions have registered as qualified foreign investors in the Saudi stock market, the exchange’s chairwoman told the Future Investment Initiative in Riyadh.

Sarah Al-Suhaimi, chairwoman of the Saudi Arabian stock exchange (Tadawul), said 200 more are expected to register.

Global index provider MSCI classified the Saudi equity market as an emerging market in June, a move expected to attract billions of dollars of passive funds.

Al-Suhaimi said she expected the number of qualified foreign investors to increase before and after the inclusion in the index, which is expected to happen in phases coinciding with index reviews in May and August 2019.