Licenses to be issued for those who wish to open cinema houses in Saudi Arabia

the content of all shows would be subject to their close control to make sure that the presented materials do not contradict with the media policy of Saudi Arabia. (Photo courtesy: social media)
Updated 11 December 2017
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Licenses to be issued for those who wish to open cinema houses in Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: Minister of Culture and Information Awwad Al-Awwad on Monday presided over a meeting of the board of directors of the General Commission for Audiovisual Media (GCAM) at the commission’s headquarters in Riyadh, in a meeting which approved the issuance of licenses to those wishing to open cinema houses in the Kingdom.
In a media statement received by Arab News, the supervisor of the cinema sector, Fahd Al-Muammar, said that GCAM, as the sector regulator, would begin preparing the necessary practical steps and procedures for running cinema houses in the Kingdom.
He added that the content of all shows would be subject to their close control to make sure that the presented materials do not contradict with the media policy of Saudi Arabia.
He stressed that all cinematic shows must be consistent with the deeply rooted social values in order to ensure presenting purposeful and attractive entertaining activities, that do not violate the ethical principles in the Kingdom.
“The Ministry of Culture and Information has gone a long way in studying the cinema sector in the Kingdom in order to prepare the necessary executive framework that could lead to creating an integrated cinematic experience, and provide a cultural and recreational experience for the entire family,” Al-Muammar said. He added that further details of regulations would later be announced.
Abdullah Al-Shamlani, spokesman for GCAM told Arab news that the commission would, after three months, issue all the official regulations for running cinema houses in the Kingdom.
“Licensing is due to begin after readying the show regulations and rules in public places within a period not exceeding 90 days,” Al-Shamlani said. He added that their role, as a watchdog, is to monitor and supervise the local cinematic scene after regulations are established.


Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan arrives in Madinah during maiden visit to Saudi Arabia

Updated 16 min 49 sec ago
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Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan arrives in Madinah during maiden visit to Saudi Arabia

  • Although bilateral relations and regional security are on the agenda of Imran Khan’s visit, a more urgent priority will be a possible economic bailout package from the KSA
  • The prime minister will call on King Salman and hold a bilateral meeting with the crown prince, said the Pakistan Foreign Office

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Imran Khan arrived in Madinah, Saudi Arabia, beginning the initial leg of his first foreign tour since taking office in August.
The premier was welcomed at Madinah Airport by the Governor of Madinah, Faisal bin Salman, Pakistani Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Hasham bin Saddique, and other members of the Pakistani consulate.
Khan, accompanied by Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi, Finance Minister Asad Umar, Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry and Adviser for Commerce Abdul Razak Dawood, is also scheduled to perform Umrah during his two-day stay in Saudi Arabia.
“The prime minister will call on His Majesty King Salman bin Abdulaziz and hold a bilateral meeting with the crown prince (His Royal Highness Mohammad Bin Salman). The king will also host a state banquet for the prime minister at the Royal Court. Accompanying ministers will also meet their counterparts to discuss bilateral cooperation,” reads a statement issued by the Foreign Office.
The Secretary-General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, Dr. Yousef bin Ahmed Al-Othaimeen, will also call on the PM during his visit.
Although bilateral relations and the regional security situation are on the agenda of Khan’s visit, a more pertinent, urgent priority will be a possible economic bailout package sought from Saudi Arabia by the new Pakistani Government.
In 2014, six months after Pakistan obtained its last IMF bailout, Saudi Arabia loaned Pakistan $1.5 billion, which the government used to strengthen its currency. Pakistan’s current account deficit increased to 43 percent ($18 billion) in the fiscal year that ended June 30.
Analysts, however, told Reuters that a fresh bailout package from the IMF, which would be Pakistan’s 13th since the late 1980s, is inevitable.
While the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Government has been debating several options to plug the hole in Pakistan’s rapidly draining foreign exchange reserves, it is also avidly trying to seek financial assistance from allied countries (including Saudi Arabia, China and the UAE) as opposed to going to the IMF.
Before the visit, Finance Minister Asad Umar said that IMF assistance would remain a “fallback option.”