Case filed against Indian man for ‘molesting’ Bollywood actress

Zaira Wasim
Updated 12 December 2017
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Case filed against Indian man for ‘molesting’ Bollywood actress

MUMBAI: Indian police have filed a sexual assault case against an airline passenger after a 17-year-old Bollywood actress said the male passenger had molested her during a late New Delhi-Mumbai flight, police said on Monday.
Zaira Wasim was seen sobbing in a video she posted to her Instagram site after getting off a Vistara flight during which, she has alleged, the passenger sitting on the seat behind her attacked her.
“He kept nudging my shoulder and continued to move his foot up and down my back and neck,” Wasim said in the post. “Is this how we are going to take care of girls?”
The video sparked outrage on social media, where fans came out in support of the actress, who shot to fame through her role as a child wrestler in the 2016 blockbuster Bollywood drama “Dangal.”
Police have registered a case against a man identified as Vikas Sachdeva, under Section 354 — for assault or criminal force to woman with intent to outrage her modesty — and the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act, a Mumbai police control room official said.
“We are investigating fully and will support Zaira in every way required,” said Vistara chief strategy and commercial officer Sanjiv Kapoor.
“We have zero tolerance for this kind of thing.”
Neither Sachdeva or his lawyers could be reached for comment.
Local media reported his wife, Divya Sachdeva, saying her husband was innocent and that he was returning from a funeral and had been asleep on the flight. She accused Wasim of having made the allegations for publicity.
A spokeswoman for the airline said it had provided details to the police and aviation authorities and its senior management had flown to Mumbai to assist Wasim in the investigation. “We are deeply concerned and regret the unfortunate experience Ms. Zaira Wasim had onboard our flight last night.”
 


Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

Updated 21 October 2018
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Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

JOHANNESBURG: Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday.
Rhinos in Chad were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago, and the six rhinos were intended to establish a new population in the country after intensive anti-poaching measures were put in place to protect them.
“We can confirm that these two rhinos (a male and a female) were not poached,” the South African environment department and Chad government said in a joint statement. “However, the exact cause of death is not yet known.”
In July, there was widespread outrage and a bitter row over responsibility when 11 black rhinos in Kenya died after being transferred to a new sanctuary, mainly due to toxic levels of salt in borehole drinking water.
The rhinos in Chad had been roaming free in Zakouma National Park since late August after a gradual acclimatization process that saw them first released into small enclosures.
The carcasses of the cow and bull were discovered on October 15.
The surviving four rhinos are being closely monitored, the statement said, adding that a specialist veterinarian had traveled to the park to conduct postmortems.
It said the cause of death would be announced as soon as possible.
In May, the six rhinos were sedated with darts, put in special ventilated steel crates and driven under police escort from Addo park in South Africa to Port Elizabeth airport.
They were then flown to Chad on a 3,000-mile (4,800-kilometer) flight, accompanied by a team of vets checking their stress levels.
The high-profile transfer, which took two years of planning, was hailed as major conservation breakthrough, with translocation organizer African Parks describing it as a “truly hopeful story.”
There are fewer than 25,000 rhinos left in the wild in Africa due to a surge in poaching, and only 5,000 of them are black rhinos.
Black rhinos are rated as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Rhinos are targeted to feed a booming demand for rhino horn in China, Vietnam and other Asian countries, where it is believed to have medicinal qualities.
Northern white rhinos disappeared from Chad several decades ago and the last western black rhino was recorded there in 1972, after decades of poaching pushed both subspecies to local extinction.
Rhinos were re-introduced to Rwanda in 2017.