CNBC to open Middle East HQ in Abu Dhabi next year

CNBC's London HQ. (Supplied)
Updated 12 December 2017
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CNBC to open Middle East HQ in Abu Dhabi next year

LONDON: Global business and financial news network CNBC is set to launch its new Middle East headquarters in Abu Dhabi in the first quarter of next year.
The network will broadcast from a studio in the emirate’s financial hub, the Abu Dhabi Global Market (ADGM).
CNBC said it will produce a daily global business show from its Abu Dhabi base, while also building up a stronger editorial presence across the region. It is looking to hire at 10 people to work at the new HQ.
“Abu Dhabi offers an excellent base for CNBC in the Middle East. It is home to many of the region’s key businesses and decision-makers as well as being a major financial services hub,” said KC Sullivan, president and managing director of CNBC International.
The broadcaster will also be offering commercial services such as tailored events and research to clients in the region, Sullivan said.
Chairman of ADGM, Ahmed Ali Al Sayegh, said: “The presence of CNBC here augments Abu Dhabi’s position as one of the leading global business and financial hubs. ADGM will continue to play its part to connect local and global businesses to opportunities in this region, as well as to enable investors to access actionable financial news and information.”
Earlier this year, the network started broadcasting regular live Middle East business updates from the ADGM presented by the Middle East anchor Hadley Gamble, ahead of establishing a permanent studio presence.
CNBC already broadcasts daily from its other regional headquarters in New York, London and Singapore.


Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

Updated 19 September 2018
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Facebook accused of discrimination with job ad targeting

  • It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only
  • Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America

WASHINGTON: A complaint has been filed with the US government accusing Facebook and 10 other companies of using the platform’s job ad targeting system to discriminate on the basis of gender.
The complaint was announced Tuesday by the American Civil Liberties Union, a union called the Communications Workers of America and a labor law firm, on behalf of three female job seekers and a group of “thousands” of members represented by the union.
It charges that job ads on Facebook targeted male users only. It also alleges that most of the listings were for jobs in male-dominated fields, so women and non-binary users were excluded from seeing these ads.
Facebook lets advertisers target ads on the basis of gender and age, which is against the law in America, the complaint reads.
“I shouldn’t be shut out of the chance to hear about a job opportunity just because I am a woman,” said Bobbi Spees, one of the three women named in the complaint.
Facebook spokesman Joe Osborne said in a statement to CNNMoney that there is no place for discrimination on Facebook.
“It’s strictly prohibited in our policies, and over the past year we’ve strengthened our systems to further protect against misuse,” Osborne said.
Facebook will defend itself once it has reviewed the complaint, he added.
The ACLU noted that online platforms such as Facebook are generally not liable for content published by others.
“But in this case, Facebook is doing much more than merely publishing content created by others,” the advocacy group argued.
“It has built the architecture for this discriminatory marketing framework, enabled and encouraged advertisers to use it, and delivered the gender-based ads according to employers’ sex-based preferences.”
Last month the US Department of Housing and Urban Development accused Facebook of breaking the law by letting landlords and home sellers use its ad-targeting system to discriminate against potential buyers or tenants.
Facebook responded by cutting more than 5,000 ad-targeting options to prevent advertisers from discriminating on the basis of traits such as religion or race.