Revenue per available room of Jeddah hotels in November lowest in a decade

Above, the Jeddah Hilton hotel. STR said Jeddah hotels’ RevPAR was pegged at SR321.06 in November, 25.4 percent lower from a year ago. (Courtesy Jeddah Hilton)
Updated 13 December 2017
0

Revenue per available room of Jeddah hotels in November lowest in a decade

DUBAI: The revenue per available room (RevPAR) of Jeddah hotels last month was the lowest for a November since 2007, industry monitor STR said in its preliminary report yesterday.
RevPAR, arguably the most important of all ratios used in the hotel industry, is derived by multiplying a hotel’s average daily room rate (ADR) by its occupancy rate. The performance metric provides a snapshot of a hotel’s business performance by incorporating room rates and occupancy levels.
STR said Jeddah hotels’ RevPAR was pegged at SR321.06 in November, 25.4 percent lower from a year ago and 26.9 percent lower from SR439.60 a month earlier.
“Preliminary November 2017 data for hotels in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, indicate significant supply growth and steep performance declines,” STR said.
Among other industry indicators, the occupancy rates in Jeddah hotels was 17.4 percent lower to 45.7 percent while average daily rate during the month was down 9.7 percent year-on-year to SR702.62.
Hotel room supply was up 9.8 percent in November, but demand went down 9.3 percent, STR noted.
The property consultancy JLL in its previous report said that a potential 900 keys could be available by the end of this year with some hotel projects scheduled to be completed, including the 445-room Hotel Galleria By Elaf.
“Over the next two years, a number of midscale hotels are also expected to open under the Ibis and Premier Inn brands,” JLL said.
“The diversification of the hotel market will make Jeddah a more attracted place to visit to broader range of visitors.
The Saudi government recently launched a multi-billion project that aims to develop 34,000 square kilometers of the Red Sea coastline and 50 reef-fringed islands into luxury resorts and luxury residences.
Construction is scheduled to begin in 2019, with the first phase of the project set to be completed by 2022.


Oman oil minister excited to be part of Sri Lanka oil refinery project

Updated 24 March 2019
0

Oman oil minister excited to be part of Sri Lanka oil refinery project

  • Sri Lanka originally said Oman’s oil ministry planned to take a 30 percent stake in the refinery
  • The India-based Accord Group is the main investor in the refinery project

HAMBANTOTA, Sri Lanka: Oman’s oil minister said on Sunday he was excited to be part of a Sri Lanka oil refinery project, an indication plans for the sultanate’s involvement may be back on track.
The comments by Mohammed bin Hamad Al-Rumhy came after an Omani official last week had denied the Middle Eastern country had agreed to invest in the project.
Rumhy joined Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe at the laying of the foundation stone for the planned $3.85 billion oil refinery at Hambantota on the south coast, which would be the island’s biggest foreign direct investment.
Sri Lanka originally said Oman’s oil ministry planned to take a 30 percent stake in the refinery, which will be built near a $1.4 billion port controlled by China Merchants Port Holdings.
The India-based Accord Group is the main investor in the refinery project, through a Singapore entity it controls.
“We have Chinese investment, we have Indian investments, we have Oman interest for investment, and we have investment interest from many other countries,” Wickremesinghe said at the event. “It shows that Hambantota will become the multinational investment zone.”
A senior Sri Lankan minister, who declined to be identified because he is not authorized to talk to the media, said Oman had given a commitment to invest in the refinery and there would not be any turning back.
But on Wednesday, Salim Al-Aufi, the undersecretary of Oman’s oil and gas ministry, said “no one on this side” was aware of the investment.
Sri Lanka’s investment board said last week that another Oman entity, Oman Trading International, was willing to supply all of the refinery’s feedstock needs and take on the marketing of the oil products it would produce.
Sri Lanka, India and China have been vying for political influence in Sri Lanka in recent years, with investment a key part of the battleground.
China is the biggest buyer of Omani oil. In January it imported about 80 percent of Oman’s crude exports, Oman government data shows.
An investment zone is planned by China Harbor Engineering Corp. alongside the port.