Dubai opens $10 million camel hospital

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Dr Cedric Chan conducts a foot surgery on a camel at the Dubai Camel Hospital in Dubai. (Reuters)
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Above, a camel is being hoisted in the operating table for foot surgery at the Dubai Camel Hospital in Dubai. (Reuters)
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A camel is being prepped for during foot surgery at the Dubai Camel Hospital in Dubai. (Reuters)
Updated 14 December 2017
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Dubai opens $10 million camel hospital

DUBAI: Pristine operating theaters and state-of-the-art medical equipment are featured in a new Dubai hospital that opened last week — exclusively for camels.
Camels remain an important part of the Gulf Arab state’s heritage. Camel races and camel beauty pageants are a favorite recreation for locals, and some beasts fetch millions of dollars at auctions in the country.
Preserving that heritage is part of the purpose of Dubai Camel Hospital, which cost Dh40 million (SR40.84 million) and is the first of its kind in the world, said Mohamed Al Bulooshi, the hospital’s director.
“We found that we must care for camels not only by breeding and raising them, but also by being able to medically treat them,” Bulooshi said.
Staffed by a team of international veterinarians, the hospital, can treat 20 camels. It’s also equipped with a mini-race track to get the camels up and running after their medical procedures.
Its customized equipment was adapted from equestrian medical equipment to accommodate camel treatment. A surgery starts at $1,000 and an X-ray or ultrasound at $110.
The hospital intends to help in the research and development of camel medicine, Ahsan Ul Haq, the facility’s head of marketing and finance, in an effort “to unfold the secrets of this strange desert animal,” he said.


Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

Updated 21 June 2018
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Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

TOKYO: A Japanese city official has been reprimanded and fined for repeatedly leaving his desk during work hours — but only for around three minutes to buy lunch.
The official, who works at the waterworks bureau in the western city of Kobe, began his designated lunch break early 26 times over the space of seven months, according to a city spokesman.
“The lunch break is from noon to 1 pm. He left his desk before the break,” the spokesman said on Thursday.
The official, 64, had half a day’s pay docked as punishment and the bosses called a news conference to apologize.
“It’s deeply regrettable that this misconduct took place. We’re sorry,” a bureau official told reporters, bowing deeply.
The worker was in violation of a public service law stating that officials have to concentrate on their jobs, according to the bureau.
The news sparked a heated debate on Japanese social media, with many defending the official.
“It’s sheer madness. It’s crazy. What about leaving your desk to smoke?” said one Twitter user.
“Is this a bad joke? Does this mean we cannot even go to the bathroom?” said another.
The city had previously suspended another official in February for a month after he had left his office numerous times to buy a ready-made lunch box during work hours.
The official was absent a total of 55 hours over six months, according to the city.