Britain First leader whom Trump re-tweeted ordered to avoid rallies

Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of the fringe anti-immigrant Britain First group (AFP)
Updated 14 December 2017
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Britain First leader whom Trump re-tweeted ordered to avoid rallies

BELFAST: A leader of a British far right group whose anti-Islamic social media posts were retweeted by US President Donald Trump was ordered on Thursday not to appear within 500 meters of any rally until a criminal case in Northern Ireland is finished.
Jayda Fransen, deputy leader of the fringe anti-immigrant Britain First group, appeared at a court in Belfast to face charges of using threatening, abusive or insulting words in a speech at a rally in the city in August.
Trump’s sharing of her anti-Muslim videos posted on Twitter provoked outrage in Britain last month, drawing a sharp rebuke from Prime Minister Theresa May and straining relations between two close allies on the global stage.
Fransen, 31, was remanded on continuing bail until January 9 on the condition that she is not allowed within 500 meters of any rally or demonstration before the case is finished.
An attempt by police to restrict Fransen’s use of social media — Twitter and Facebook — was rejected by the judge.
Fransen, who was fined last month after being found guilty by a court in England of religiously aggravated harassment for shouting abuse at a Muslim woman wearing a hijab, would be pleading not guilty, her lawyer told Belfast Magistrates Court.
Paul Golding, the leader of Britain First, was also arrested as he accompanied Fransen to court, the group said.
The Police Service of Northern Ireland said a 35-year-old man was detained for questioning over a speech at the same rally in Belfast in August.
Golding, 35, is a former senior figure in the far-right British National Party and founded Britain First in 2011.
The group describes itself as a “patriotic political party and street movement,” but critics denounce it as a far-right, racist organization.


Brooklyn Diocese to pay $27.5M to settle 4 sex abuse claims

In this May 15, 2018, file photo, acting New York state Attorney General Barbara D. Underwood speaks in Albany, N.Y. (AP)
Updated 57 min 11 sec ago
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Brooklyn Diocese to pay $27.5M to settle 4 sex abuse claims

  • These were boys who were abused in second grade through sixth grade, for years for some of them

NEW YORK: Four men who said they were sexually abused as boys by a teacher at a Catholic church have reached a $27.5 million settlement with the Diocese of Brooklyn.
The New York Times reports Tuesday that the agreement is one of the largest settlements ever awarded to sexual abuse victims within the Catholic Church. The men will each receive about $6.8 million.
The settlement comes just two weeks after the New York attorney general subpoenaed all eight Roman Catholic dioceses in the state as part of an investigation into the handling of sex abuse allegations. A grand jury report this summer found rampant sexual abuse of more than 1,000 children by about 300 priests in Pennsylvania.
“These were boys who were abused in second grade through sixth grade, for years for some of them,” said Ben Rubinowitz, one of the lawyers for the victims. “The egregious nature of the conduct is the reason that the church paid what they did.”
Lawyers for the victims say 67-year-old Angelo Serrano, a lay teacher of religion at St. Lucy’s-St. Patrick’s Church in Brooklyn, repeatedly abused the victims between 2003 and 2009. Serrano is serving a 15-year sentence after pleading guilty in 2011 to inappropriate course of sexual conduct with a child.
“We hope this is another step forward in the healing process for these claimants,” the Diocese of Brooklyn said in a statement. “The Diocese remains committed to ensuring that its parishes, schools and youth programs remain safe and secure for the young people who are entrusted to our care.”
The statement added that Serrano was a “volunteer worker” at a local parish and “was not clergy or an employee of the Diocese or parish.”
Since June 2017, 414 victims have applied for settlements through the Independent Reconciliation Compensation Program in Brooklyn. Other dioceses in the state run similar programs.
The latest settlement comes just two weeks after New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood subpoenaed all eight Roman Catholic dioceses in the state as part of an investigation into the handling of sex abuse allegations.