Knicks hold on to beat Nets after Porzingis leaves

Spencer Dinwiddie #8 of the Brooklyn Nets reacts after a call was not made against the New York Knicks at the Barclays Center on Dec. 14, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Elsa/Getty Images/AFP)
Updated 15 December 2017
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Knicks hold on to beat Nets after Porzingis leaves

NEW YORK: Brooklyn coach Kenny Atkinson asked before facing the Knicks if anyone knew how to stop Kristaps Porzingis.
The Nets never really did, and they couldn’t beat New York even after the star forward was injured.
Courtney Lee scored 18 of his 27 points in the second half, Michael Beasley added 15, and the Knicks held on to beat the Nets 111-104 on Thursday night after Porzingis left the game due to a sore left knee early in the second half.
Replays showed Porzingis motioning to the bench with 9:25 remaining in the third after contesting a shot made by Brooklyn’s Rondae Hollis-Jefferson. The Knicks’ leading scorer had 13 points in nearly 18 minutes in the first half.
“It was one play when I actually made the pass out to the corner to Courtney and hit the 3. I felt my knee just kind of buckle maybe a little bit and I felt a little pain there,” the 22-year-old from Latvia said. “It’s more of just being cautious. I had a little sharp pain there. I honestly don’t have any more information about what is going on there, but it shouldn’t be, hopefully, not too serious.”
Porzingis added that he is unsure whether he would play Saturday night against Oklahoma City in Carmelo Anthony’s first game back at Madison Square Garden after he was traded in September.
Enes Kanter had 13 points and nine rebounds for the Knicks, who earned just their second road victory of the season. Their only other one was Oct. 29 at Cleveland.
The second of four meetings this season had a lively atmosphere, especially late in the second half when Brooklyn made its push with Porzingis out for good.
“When KP went out, Mike really stepped up there for that stretch and got us buckets,” Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek said. “Late in the game we said, ‘That’s their run.’ It was a battle. To me, as a coach, it was a great game to watch. Guys were flying around and hitting each other.”
Spencer Dinwiddie had a career-high 26 points for the Nets, who have dropped the first two games to their city rivals. Hollis-Jefferson added a career-best 25 points on 10-for-16 shooting and Caris LeVert scored 15.
“We just couldn’t make the plays down the stretch we needed to make,” said Allen Crabbe, who shot just 1 for 8, including 1 for 7 from 3-point territory.
The Nets made only 12 for 42 beyond the 3-point line.
New York appeared on its way to an easy one after shooting 23 for 43 from the field and 6 for 13 from the 3-point line and leading by as many as 18 points in the first half. The Nets rallied to take an 82-79 lead on DeMarre Carroll’s 3-pointer with 1:49 left in the third.
But the Knicks went on an 8-0 run to close the quarter, capped by Lee’s 3-point shot that increased their lead to 87-82 with 25 seconds left.
Brooklyn trailed 100-97 with 3:29 to go before a 3-pointer by rookie Frank Ntilikina and an impressive defensive Knicks effort, contesting five straight shots, including a block by Ron Baker under the rim that forced a jump ball. Lance Thomas then sealed it with a 3 that made it 106-97 with 1:07 left.
“We were scrappy, man. We fought,” Thomas said. “Ron came in and gave us a really big boost and we were just tenacious tonight. We didn’t want them to outdo us.”


Sorry, mum and dad — Indian shooting star bans parents from foreign trips

Updated 18 August 2018
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Sorry, mum and dad — Indian shooting star bans parents from foreign trips

  • The 16-year-old has brought home World Cup and Commonwealth Games gold medals this year
  • The Asian Games promises to be the toughest field yet for her

PALEMBANG, Indonesia: Teenage shooter Manu Bhaker said she’s told her parents not to accompany her to tournaments abroad as she struggles to adapt to life as one of India’s best known sportswomen.
The 16-year-old has brought home World Cup and Commonwealth Games gold medals this year in a sudden rise to fame, and is one of the favorites at the Asian Games in Indonesia.
But she is finding that success comes at a price, with a tough training schedule and a restrictive lifestyle that means less time with friends and a one-hour daily time limit for using her mobile phone.
Bhaker said she had resorted to banning her parents from her overseas trips as she tries to carve out a slice of freedom.
“They make limits for me, like, ‘Eat that, eat this, don’t go there, do this, don’t do this, don’t use your phone, don’t do this now, go to bed,’” she tells AFP before a training session in Palembang, which is co-hosting the Asian Games along with Jakarta.
“It’s a bit too much.”
Bhaker’s day kicks off at 5am with yoga and meditation, and ends with a jog and bootcamp-style workout.
But perhaps most punishing of all, she and the other ‘juniors’ on the Indian team are only allowed one hour with their phones each day.
In spite of her age, Bhaker is competing at senior level for the 25m sports pistol and both the individual and mixed team 10m air pistol.
She is proud of her achievement but, yes, the unfairness does grates when she sees older members of her team.
“They’re seniors. They’re free. They can do anything they want,” she says wistfully of her team-mates. “They can use their phones any time.”
Bhaker swept to fame at the beginning of this year by becoming the youngest Indian to win a gold medal at the World Cup, a feat she achieved the individual 10m air pistol and the mixed team event.
She then climbed back on the podium once again at Australia’s Gold Coast in April, setting a Commonwealth Games record of 240.9 points for the 10m air pistol.
The Asian Games promises to be the toughest field yet with the world number nine taking on fourth-ranked Ji Xiaojing of China.
Life on the road takes its toll too.
Bhaker says she has spent fewer than 10 days at her home in Haryana state since February and knows her studies have suffered in spite of some tuition on the road.
She also admits she feels lonely sometimes.
“Your friends are like, ‘No, we can’t have fun with her. She’s a Commonwealth gold medallist — we must respect her,’” she says. “Your friend circle decreases.”
Her coach Jaspal Rana agrees the cycle of competitions and training camps is tough for youngsters who often crave normality.
But they need to decide what they want out of life, he says.
“People come and go. But there are few people who become real champions, real heroes — so you need to work for that.”