Bangladeshi man — who feeds 2,000 birds every morning — is now a national attraction

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Samor Kumar Ghosh feeding birds. (AN photos)
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Samor Kumar Ghosh feeding birds. (AN photos)
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Samor Kumar Ghosh feeding birds. (AN photos)
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Samor Kumar Ghosh feeding birds. (AN photos)
Updated 15 December 2017
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Bangladeshi man — who feeds 2,000 birds every morning — is now a national attraction

DHAKA: Samor Kumar Ghosh has been feeding 2,000 local birds every morning for the past five years. The birds start gathering early each morning in front of Samar’s sweetmeat shop in the local city of Pabna, some 200 km from Dhaka.
The birds, called “shalik” in the native language, are commonly referred to as mynahs.
One morning five years ago, Samor fed a few of them. The next day he noticed more birds had gathered at the same time. And day after day, the number of birds increased and now reach up to 2,000.
“It was February 2012, early on a winter morning. I was standing idle in front of my sweetmeat shop … I noticed a few Indian mynahs roaming around in search of food. I fed them with chanachur (Bombay mix), which is a subcontinental snack food. The next day, the mynahs came in a group and (there were) more in number,” Samor told Arab News.
Samor feeds them every day with much affection. And now a large number of people from the city and adjacent towns gather in front of his “Shyamol Mistanno Bhandar” sweetmeat shop to watch the mynahs.
“This is amazing. The mynah, although a quarrelling species of bird, here feed so calmly and quietly. One can only hear the chirping of the birds,” Arman Hossain, one of the spectators at Samor’s “bird sanctuary within the city,” told Arab News.
“The mynahs travel 10 to 15 km every day to enjoy their breakfast with me. I spend 45,000 taka (nearly $600) per month to feed them. To me, it is like paradise when the mynahs encircle me at the start of the day,” Samor said.

In Bangladesh, a middle-class family might find it hard to spend $600 a month on living but Samor is spending a huge amount on feeding the birds. He justifies the expenditure saying, “Actually I am not doing anything. It is the Almighty, and if He (Almighty) wishes, I will have the ability to do more for His creatures.”
Samor’s efforts have made him a nationally-acclaimed nature-lover. Last year the Bangladesh Forest Department presented him with the country’s best “bird-lover” award.
Samor, a father of four, has involved family members in the project. His 11-year-old son Sharon Kumar Ghosh sometimes feeds the birds when Samor is out of town on business. Samor has asked is son to continue the tradition of feeding the mynahs in the future.


’Lava bomb’ from Hawaii volcano injures 23 on boat

Updated 17 July 2018
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’Lava bomb’ from Hawaii volcano injures 23 on boat

  • Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanos and one of five on the island
  • The eruption has destroyed hundreds of homes since it began on May 3

LOS ANGELES: A projectile from the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii struck a boat carrying people watching lava from the two-month-old eruption, injuring 23, the fire department said.
Thirteen of them required hospitalization and the rest were treated at a harbor when the boat engaged in a “lava tour” returned to the Big Island, also known as Hawaii.
Lava flowing into the Pacific is a spectacular sight, producing a foggy haze known in Hawaii as “laze.”
One woman was in serious condition with a fractured femur.
The total number of people on the boat was not immediately known, the Hawaii County Fire Department said.
In the early morning incident a “lava bomb” punctured the roof of the boat and damaged a railing, the department said. It gave no further details.
“It was an explosion, basically,” said Janet Snyder, a spokeswoman for the county mayor, told the Tribune Herald newspaper. “It punctured a hole right through the roof of the boat.”
She described the boat as “covered with lava.”
The eruption has destroyed hundreds of homes since it began on May 3.
Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanos and one of five on the island.
One of the most active fissures, number 8, continues to erupt and its lava has formed a small “island” a few meters from the coast, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).
It is very likely that it is part of the flow of fissure 8 that is entering the ocean, the USGS says.
Lava has engulfed an area of about eight square miles (20 square kilometers) since the volcano began erupting.
Scientists believe that volcanic activity can be a precursor to a major eruption, similar to a Kilauea eruption in the mid-1920s.