Canadian-Iranian sentenced to prison for sanctions violations

A Canadian-Iranian man was sentenced Friday to 32 months in prison. (Shutterstock)
Updated 16 December 2017
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Canadian-Iranian sentenced to prison for sanctions violations

WASHINGTON: A Canadian-Iranian man was sentenced Friday to 32 months in prison for violating US sanctions against Iran.
Between 2014 and 2016, Ali Soofi, 63, “conspired to export military items from the United States to Iran, both directly and through transshipment to intermediary countries, without a license,” according to prosecutors.
Soofi “sought to purchase and ship numerous items, including helicopters, high-tech machine gun parts, tank parts, and military vehicles, from the United States to Iran, all without a license and while knowing that such shipments were illegal under US law,” a statement from the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York added.
He pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate US sanctions against Iran, and was sentenced to 32 months in prison plus one year of supervised release.
Washington has implemented a series of economic sanctions against Tehran and its elite Revolutionary Guards Corps forces.
In November, the US sanctioned a network of individuals and companies accused of forging money to help the Revolutionary Guards.


France’s ban on full-body Islamic veil violates human rights: UN rights panel

Updated 24 min 39 sec ago
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France’s ban on full-body Islamic veil violates human rights: UN rights panel

  • France had failed to make the case for its ban and ordered it to review the legislation, the committee said in a statement
GENEVA: The UN Human Rights Committee said on Tuesday that France’s ban on the niqab, the full-body Islamic veil, was a violation of human rights and ordered it to review the legislation.
France had failed to make the case for its ban, the committee said, and gave it 180 days to report back to say what actions it had taken.
“In particular, the Committee was not persuaded by France’s claim that a ban on face covering was necessary and proportionate from a security standpoint or for attaining the goal of ‘living together’ in society,” it said.
Decisions taken by the committee, a panel of independent experts who oversee compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), are not legally binding, but under an optional protocol of the treaty, France has an international legal obligation to comply “in good faith.”
The committee’s findings come after complaints by two French women convicted in 2012 under a 2010 law stipulating that “No one may, in a public space, wear any article of clothing intended to conceal the face.”
The Committee said the ban disproportionately harmed their right to manifest their religious beliefs and could lead to them being confined at home and marginalized. It also ordered France to pay compensation to the two women.
The committee’s chair Yuval Shany said the findings were not an endorsement of the full-body veil and that he and several others on the 18-member panel considered it a form of oppression.