Famous Russian photographer follows wife to the UAE

Nataly Osmann in Dubai
Updated 17 December 2017
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Famous Russian photographer follows wife to the UAE

JEDDAH: Murad Osmann, the Russian photographer behind the iconic hand-holding travel photographs taken around the world, and his model wife Nataly Osmann recently took their #Followmeto Instagram photo series to the UAE. The duo visited a number of famous sites in Abu Dhabi and were seemingly impressed.
Murad captured a stunning photo of his wife, who donned flowing attire and a hijab at the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, which he described as the “eighth wonder of the world.”
“#followmeto Sheikh Zayed Mosque with @natalyosmann. Bucket list check for us it is definitely 8th wonder of the world. What is your top 3 bucket list? #InAbuDhabi @visitabudhabi,” he wrote on Instagram.
The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is ranked second in the world’s Top 25 Landmarks according to www.tripadvisor.com
In another shot, the photographer, who has a following of 4.6 million fans on Instagram, shows Nataly at the recently opened Louvre Abu Dhabi
“#followmeto Louvre Abu Dhabi with @natalyosmann where East meets West. Feels like you are on a different planet,” he wrote.
In one of the first photos from Abu Dhabi shared by Murad, Nataly is seen in the background of the emirate’s desert.
“Dubai means sunshine no matter what the season. It’s the cloudless sky and closeness to the sea... In the city where shadow is a privilege, sunglasses are the principal accessory,” Nataly wrote on Instagram.
The couple visited the UAE in 2015 as well as earlier this year in January, when they shared daring shots from on top of Dubai’s skyscrapers.
The Moscow-based couple, whose beautiful photographs have led to a book deal and numerous magazine spreads, have been traveling around the world for five years.


Napoleon fever confirmed as hat sells for €350,000

Updated 18 June 2018
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Napoleon fever confirmed as hat sells for €350,000

  • The final price far exceeded the expected €30,000 to €40,000 for the distinctive “bicorne” hat, which Napoleon wore sideways — rather than with points at the front and back — so he could easily be spotted on the battlefield.
  • Auctioneer Etienne De Baecque: “There’s a sort of craze going on with historical souvenirs, in particular those from Napoleon.”

LYON: A two-cornered military dress hat thought to have belonged to Napoleon went for €350,000 ($406,000) at auction on Monday, the latest sale to highlight the boundless appetite for all things associated with the emperor.
The final price far exceeded the expected €30,000 to €40,000 for the distinctive “bicorne” hat, which Napoleon wore sideways — rather than with points at the front and back — so he could easily be spotted on the battlefield.
The identify of the buyer was not disclosed.
“There’s a sort of craze going on with historical souvenirs, in particular those from Napoleon,” Etienne De Baecque, the auctioneer leading the sale in the eastern city of Lyon, told AFP.
Yet despite details that suggest the hat is one of about 120 the “Little Corsican” went through during his 15 years in power, there is no conclusive proof it belonged to him.
Most of them were made by the French hatmakers Poupard in black felted beaver fur, though only a handful of confirmed examples still exist.
“There are some distinctive elements: Napoleon hated the internal band so he always had it removed,” as is the case with the model sold Monday, De Baecque said.
It has long been attributed to the emperor, with records confirming its ownership since a Dutch captain took it as a war trophy after the battle of Waterloo in 1815.
The auction house said the hat was sold with the box used for its display at the World Expo in Brussels in 1897.
It had passed down through the captain’s family until the end of the last century, when it was sold to a French collector.
Monday’s sale still fell short of the €1.9 million paid for a Napoleon bicorne four years ago — part of a prestigious collection auctioned off by Monaco’s royal family — to the owner of the South Korean food and agriculture giant Harim.
Demand for all things Napoleon has often sent prices spiralling well above estimates.
Last November a fragile gold laurel leaf from the crown made for Napoleon’s coronation in 1804, weighing just 10 grams, was sold for €625,000.