Arab icons Assala Nasri, Nawal El-Kuwaitia set for Saudi concerts

Assala Nasri
Updated 18 December 2017
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Arab icons Assala Nasri, Nawal El-Kuwaitia set for Saudi concerts

RIYADH: Two women-only concerts will be held in Saudi Arabia in January, featuring Arab pop stars Nawal El-Kuwaitia and Assala Nasri, announced Rotana Audio & Visual Group, according to Sayidaty magazine.
“Rotana has received requests from the Saudi audience to hold concerts with several Arab singers,” Rotana CEO Salem Al-Hindi said during Kora Rotana, a Rotana Khalijia show.
He added: “The list of requested singers includes Wael Kfoury, Assi El-Helani, Najwa Karam, Elissa, Amr Diab, Mohamed Hamaki, Sherine, and Angham.”
Al-Hindi pointed out that the company is trying to meet the audience’s demands by organizing women-only and family concerts.
He also said that famous pop stars reached out to Rotana, including Fares Karam, El-Helani, and Kfoury, offering to perform concerts in Saudi Arabia soon.
The concerts come after Yemeni-Emirati singer Balqees Fathi and Lebanese soprano Heba Tawaji captivated the audience during female-only concerts in Jeddah and Riyadh, respectively, earlier this month.
Al-Kuwaitia, 51, is known as the Queen of Classic Music, Harp of Khaliji Song, the Gulf’s Fairooz and the Sun and Moon of Kuwait. She currently has 16 albums and has collaborated with many composers and poets.
Syrian music artist Nasri, 48, is one of the most popular singers in the Arab world and the daughter of late Syrian artist Mustafa Nasri. Nasri is famous for her strong, melodious voice. Her latest album “Mohtama bel Tafaseel” (Concerned with Details) released earlier this year.
 


Suspected World War II bomb blasts crater in German field

Updated 24 June 2019
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Suspected World War II bomb blasts crater in German field

  • The explosion left a 10-meter wide and four-meter deep hole
  • About 10 percent of the millions of bombs dropped on Germany during World War II did not explode

BERLIN: A bomb likely dating to World War II exploded in a field in western Germany leaving a huge crater but no injuries, police said Monday.
The explosion left a 10-meter (33 feet) wide and four-meter deep hole after residents in Limburg, heard a loud noise and felt the earth shake at 0352 (0152 GMT) on Sunday morning.
“The crater was examined on Monday by an explosive ordnance clearance service to find possible fragments,” a police spokesman told AFP.
“The area was used for target practice during the Second World War,” he added.
A bomb disposal service spokesman said it was “highly possible” WW II ordnance was involved.
A local government spokesman in the nearby city of Darmstadt told German daily Bild it was believed the bomb had a chemical-based delayed timer which could have finally eroded.
Nearly 75 years after the end of war, Germany remains littered with unexploded ordnance, a legacy of the Allied bombing campaign against Nazi Germany.
Earlier this month, a 100-kilo (220-pound) US bomb from the war, discovered during building work near a shopping complex, was defused in central Berlin after the evacuation of around 3,000 people.
According to experts, 10 percent of the millions of bombs dropped on Germany during the conflict did not explode.