UK’s Princess Charlotte to start at nursery next year

Prince William, Catherine, and their two children Prince George and Princess Charlotte pose for their 2017 Christmas card.
Updated 18 December 2017
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UK’s Princess Charlotte to start at nursery next year

LONDON: Princess Charlotte, the daughter of Britain’s Prince William and wife Kate, is to start at a nursery school near the family home in west London early next year, her father’s office said on Monday.
The two-year-old, fourth-in-line to the British throne behind her father, whose official title is Duke of Cambridge, her elder brother George and grandfather Prince Charles, will attend the Willcocks Nursery School in Kensington.
“We are delighted that The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have chosen the Willcocks Nursery School for Princess Charlotte,” the school said in a statement. “We look forward to welcoming Charlotte to our nursery in January.”
On its website the school, rated as “outstanding” by government inspectors, describes itself as traditional, saying it “strives to maintain its ethos for high standards, excellence and good manners.” Fees are £3,050 ($4,072) per term for mornings and £1,800 for afternoons.


Unlike previous senior royals, Prince William attended nursery school as a child.
His son George made the step up from nursery to primary school in September when he began at Thomas’s Battersea, a private school in southwest London which is also close to the family’s Kensington Palace home. As well as announcing news of Charlotte’s new school, William and Kate released a new portrait photograph of their family which adorns their Christmas cards this year. Kate is pregnant with the couple’s third child with the new royal baby due in April.
 


A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

Updated 20 July 2018
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A hairy issue: Sailors tell the US Navy, ‘We want beards’

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island: Now that women in the Navy can wear ponytails, men want beards.
The Navy said last week that servicewomen could sport ponytails, lock hairstyles, or ropelike strands, and wider hair buns, reversing a policy that long forbade females from letting their hair down.
Servicemen immediately chimed in on social media, asking the Navy if they could grow beards. A sailor’s Facebook post with a #WeWantBeards hashtag was shared thousands of times.
Beards were banned in 1984. The Navy wanted professional-looking sailors who could wear firefighting masks and breathing apparatuses without interference.
The Navy says that’s still the case. Still, some hope the change in female grooming standards opens the door.
Travis Rader, a 29-year-old naval physical security officer, said allowing beards would boost morale for men, just like allowing ponytails and locks has for women. There are two things that would make many Navy men happy: beards and better boots, he added.
Rader had a 6-inch-long beard when he joined the Navy after high school.
“You take something away from somebody, and they want it more,” said Rader, a master-at-arms assigned to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City.
The Navy announced it was adding grooming options for women during a Facebook Live event. Many black women had asked the Navy to be more inclusive of different hair textures. The Navy had the standards in place because of safety concerns and to ensure everyone maintained a uniform, professional look.
Rader was one of several sailors who wrote in the comments section of the Facebook Live event to press for beards. Bill Williams, a 20-year-old naval information systems technician, commented too, asking why sailors can’t have beards if bearded civilian firefighters wear masks.
Williams said he thinks a nice, well-groomed beard looks very professional.
“It’d be great because I know that when I shave for multiple days in a row, it starts to really hurt,” said Williams, who works at the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Hampton Roads in Virginia.
Sailors can get permission to grow a beard for religious reasons or if they have a skin condition that’s irritated by shaving. Mustaches are allowed as long as they are trimmed and neat.
“Handlebar mustaches, goatees, beards or eccentricities are not permitted,” the policy states. The Navy isn’t currently considering changing that.
Safety continues to be the primary concern, said Lt. J.G. Stuart Phillips, a spokesman for the chief of naval personnel. He referenced a 2016 study by the Naval Safety Center, which concluded that facial hair affects the proper fit and performance of respirators.