Mariah Carey back to Times Square New Year celebrations after debacle

Mariah Carey
Updated 26 December 2017
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Mariah Carey back to Times Square New Year celebrations after debacle

NEW YORK: Mariah Carey must have made a New Year’s resolution to ensure a better sound system.
The pop diva confirmed that she will return to Times Square in New York to ring in 2018, a year after she was humiliated by technical issues at the annual televised ball-drop.
“We can all agree that last year didn’t go exactly as planned and we are thrilled to move forward together to provide America with an incredible night of music and celebration,” Carey said in a joint statement on Friday with Dick Clark Productions, which runs the show.
The microphone system last year began to malfunction as Carey sang the opening notes of the New Year’s song “Auld Lang Syne.”
A visibly upset Carey said she was leaving but then stayed, with her back-up dancers still performing and the producers switching to an audio recording of her voice.
She half-heartedly mimed her way through her hit “Emotions,” in what was meant to be the entertainment climax for the throngs waiting hours in the cold in Times Square.
Carey, famed for her sweeping five-octave vocal range, was one of the best-selling artists of the 1990s. She developed a close association with the holiday season through her hit “All I Want for Christmas Is You” and for several years has performed a set of Christmas-themed concerts in New York.
The latest New Year’s Eve celebration will also feature pop singer Nick Jonas and the former Fifth Harmony vocalist Camila Cabello, whose debut solo album is one of the most anticipated releases of early 2018.


Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

A handout photograph recieved in London on March 25, 2019, shows the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington's fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation. (AFP)
Updated 26 March 2019
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Exhibit highlights Wellington’s formative Indian years

  • The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park

LONDON: An exhibition on the Duke of Wellington’s time in India opens in London Saturday, shedding light on formative years before he defeated French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.
Between 1796 and 1804, as the young Arthur Wellesley, he helped overthrow the Tipu Sultan and masterminded victory in the Battle of Assaye.
A decade later he defeated Napoleon, paving the way for a century of relative peace in Europe and a time of vast British imperial expansion.
The collection includes a dinner service commemorating his leadership in India that was later supplemented with cutlery taken from Napoleon’s carriage.
It also includes books from the 200-volume traveling library that, aged 27, he took with him for the six-month voyage to India in a bid to broaden his education, having finished his studies early.
It included books on India’s history, politics and economics, Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and philosophical works.
The “Young Wellington in India” exhibition runs from Saturday until November 3 at Apsley House, which remains the Wellesley family’s London home, on the edge of Hyde Park.
Charles Wellesley, 73, the ninth and current Duke of Wellington, said his great-great-great grandfather’s time in India set the stage for defeating Napoleon.
“It was very, very formative... There is no doubt that he learnt a great deal in India,” he said on Monday.
“Napoleon underestimated Wellington and the reason for this exhibition is to show how important in Wellington’s life was his period in India.”
The exhibition features swords, paintings and the Deccan Dinner Service, a vast silver gilt service bought by Wellington’s fellow officers in the Deccan region of India as a mark of their appreciation.
The cutlery for the service was taken from Napoleon after Waterloo and carries his imperial crest.
The service is still used by the family.
Josephine Oxley, keeper of the Wellington Collection, said the India years were “a time when he learned to meld the military and the political, and became skilled at negotiations with the locals.
“It’s a really interesting period of his life.”