Crowdfunding saves crumbling French chateau

An aerial view of the 19th-century chateau de La Mothe-Chandeniers, which is now owned by around 25,000 people from 115 countries through a crowndfunding aimed to buy and restore the structure. (AFP)
Updated 27 December 2017

Crowdfunding saves crumbling French chateau

POITIERS, France: It’s a modern story of an ancient fairytale castle: a crowdfunding effort online has raised €1.6 million (SR7.12 million) to restore a chateau in western France.
Around 25,000 people from 115 countries have become shareholders in the chateau de La Mothe-Chandeniers which has turrets, a moat and an elderly owner who had not maintained it.
The 19th-century building has fallen into disrepair with trees and vegetation sprouting out of its roof and windows, raising fears that it might be knocked down and redeveloped by property developers.
Thanks to a joint effort by online fundraising site Dartagnans.fr and a local association Adopte un Chateau (Adopt a Chateau), sufficient money has been raised to buy and restore the structure.
“It’s a record in France and probably in Europe in terms of the amount raised and the number of contributors,” the head of Dartagnans, Romain Delaume, said on Tuesday.
The website offered buyers the chance to become shareholders in the castle at the cost of €51: €50 as a donation for the restoration work and one euro to buy a share in a joint company set up to manage the site.
Organizers initially hoped for around 10,000 people, but thanks partly to reports in the French media the final number of donors came in at just under 19,000.
Many of them bought shareholdings for friends and family as presents, meaning that the total number of owners of the chateau will be around 25,000.
Most of them are from France, but people from as far afield as Afghanistan, Burkina Faso and Peru now have a small slice of history in the French countryside near the wine-growing Loire valley.
“Bravo for this initiative both collective and private,” wrote the aristocratic speaker of France’s parliament, Francois de Rugy, on Twitter. “France’s historic buildings need a diverse range of ideas to be saved and developed.”
The current chateau de La Mothe-Chandeniers dates back to the 19th century but the site has been home to a castle since at least the 13th century.
It was pillaged after the French Revolution in 1789 and heavily damaged in a fire in 1932 before being bought by its current owner, an 82-year-old local man, in 1982.
A thorough survey will be undertaken in the next few weeks to check the scale of the damage to the structure and the site will then be secured pending the start of restoration work.
Various ideas have been floated for the future from turning it into a “collaborative and creative laboratory,” somewhere for artists to work, or a bed-and-breakfast holiday destination.
Getting all the shareholders to agree might be a challenge.
They will be invited for a visit “as soon as possible in 2018,” said Delaume, and will be asked to take part in the restoration work.
He also stressed that not all of the building can be returned to its former glory because a complete overhaul has been estimated to cost at least €3 million.
Another round of fundraising in the future has not been excluded.


Police raid K-pop agency over alleged illegal gambling

Updated 17 August 2019

Police raid K-pop agency over alleged illegal gambling

  • Yang Hyun-suk founder and ex-chief producer of YG Entertainment, resigned after drug and sex scandals rocked the company
  • Local news reports said Yang was alleged to have engaged in ‘habitual and illegal gambling’

SEOUL: South Korean police raided one of the biggest K-pop management firms on Saturday as part of an investigation into music mogul Yang Hyun-suk’s alleged illicit gambling.
Yang, founder and ex-chief producer of YG Entertainment, resigned from his post in June after drug and sex scandals rocked the company since March.
He was placed under formal investigation by police earlier this week over allegations of gambling involving illicit cash exchange along with Seungri, a former member of YG’s highly popular band BIGBANG.
“We are trying to gather evidence on how (Yang) secured funds for gambling, and how many times the alleged gambling took place,” a Seoul police officer told AFP.
Local news reports said Yang was alleged to have engaged in “habitual and illegal gambling,” in locations including Macau and Las Vegas since the early 2000s.
Yang was also separately placed under investigation by police last month for allegedly arranging sex services for foreign investors back in 2014.
A member of the popular boy band Seo Tae Ji and Boys in the 1990s, Yang developed YG into a K-pop powerhouse with the success of idol groups such as BIGBANG and BLACKPINK.
The firm is now considered one of South Korea’s top three entertainment agencies alongside SM and JYP, and was behind the 2012 mega hit “Gangnam Style” by Psy that helped raise K-pop’s global profile.
But it has been in hot water since Yang and some of its stars were implicated in a spate of scandals.
Seungri, whose real name is Lee Seung-hyun, retired in March after being accused of arranging sex services for potential investors in his business.
In June, fellow YG artist Kim Han-bin, a member of boyband iKon, left the group amid allegations he had bought illegal drugs three years ago — in a case Yang is also accused of trying to cover up.
Earlier this year, a building owned by another YG star Daesung also came under investigation over an allegation that four of its tenants were involved with illicit sex and drug businesses.