Muslim World League holds global peace forum in South Africa

MWL Secretary-General Mohammed Al-Issa addresses the opening session of the international forum in Durban. (SPA)
Updated 31 December 2017
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Muslim World League holds global peace forum in South Africa

RIYADH: The Muslim World League (MWL) held an international forum in Durban, South Africa, on Dec. 25.
The event, entitled “For a Safer World: Followers of Religions Unite Against Hatred, Extremism and Terrorism,” was inaugurated by Mayor of Durban Zandile Gumede, in the presence of MWL Secretary-General Mohammed Al-Issa, a number of South African government ministers and representatives from many different religions.
Al-Issa thanked all those present for their cooperation and partnership with the MWL in organizing the forum, the Saudi Press Agency (SPA) reported.
He stressed the need to promote the values of love and cooperation, and the league’s desire to fight all kinds of abuse of people of all religions, races, cultures and countries.
Al-Issa also said that the MWL is an international bridge promoting forgiveness, coexistence and peace, and that it has many international partners who welcome a moderate Islamic stance promoting coexistence and efforts to fight extremism and terrorism.
The secretary-general stressed that the true interpretation of Islamic texts is revealed by traditional mainstream scholars, not by isolated extremists falsely claiming to represent Islam.
He concluded that the MWL does not discriminate religiously or ethnically, and aims to serve everyone, as “Islam is a religion that serves God without expecting anything in return.”
Gumede thanked the MWL for letting Durban be a part of its program on its African tour, organized in cooperation with eThekwini Municipality.
She also praised the league’s international message that “spreads the culture of forgiveness, peace, understanding and love among religions and cultures around the world,” and for its efforts to enhance communication throughout the world.


Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

Updated 36 min ago
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Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

  • The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia
  • The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease

GENEVA: Outbreaks of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) killed 23 people in Saudi Arabia between Jan. 21 and May 31 this year, the World Health Organization said on Monday.
The deaths were among 75 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during the period, the WHO said, and take the total number of deaths from the disease to 790 since it was first diagnosed in humans in 2012.
The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia.
One outbreak in February hit a private hospital in Hafer Albatin region, where the patient passed the disease to three health workers. There was another cluster of six cases in a hospital in Riyadh in the same month, although no health care workers were infected.
Two other clusters affected households in Jeddah and Najran.
MERS-CoV is a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. It appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012, although it has been traced in camels, the source of the infection, back to at least 1983.
The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease.
But it kills one in three sufferers, and hospital workers are at risk unless extreme caution is taken to identify MERS sufferers early and to protect health care workers from infection via airborne droplets such as from coughs and sneezes.
Susceptible people should avoid contact with suspected cases and with camels, and anyone who has contact with animals should wash their hands before and afterwards, the WHO said. Everyone should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating undercooked meat.
Three MERS cases have been reported this year outside Saudi Arabia. Oman and the United Arab Emirates each reported a case, while in Malaysia a man fell ill after drinking unpasteurised camel milk during a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia.