Deputy killed, five wounded in ‘domestic’ shooting in Colorado

An investigator heads to the scene of shooting on Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017, in Highlands Ranch, Colo. Authorities in Colorado say one deputy has died and multiple others were wounded, along with two civilians, in a shooting that followed a domestic disturbance in suburban Denver. (AP)
Updated 31 December 2017
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Deputy killed, five wounded in ‘domestic’ shooting in Colorado

WASHINGTON: A sheriff’s deputy was killed and seven other people, including five deputies, were wounded Sunday in what police called a “domestic disturbance” in a residential suburb near Denver, Colorado.
The lone suspect was “shot & believed to be dead” after the standoff at the Copper Canyon apartment complex in Highlands Ranch, 12 miles (20 kilometers) south of Denver, the Douglas County sheriff’s office tweeted. Details of the incident were not immediately clear.
The wounded were taken to two area hospitals, at least three of them with noncritical injuries, the Denver Post reported.
Deputies had responded to an early-morning call of a disturbance when shots were fired from the building. Police quickly dispatched a heavily armed SWAT team as well as a bomb-squad truck, though there was no immediate word of any explosives being found.
Police from five jurisdictions, including Colorado state police, were placed on alert.
As the incident unfurled, the sheriff’s office advised local residents to take cover in place and stay away from windows.
The toll among deputies Sunday appeared to be one of the highest in a police-involved shooting since five officers in Dallas, Texas were shot to death and several others injured in July 2016 by a man angered by police shootings of black men.
The area near Sunday’s shooting has been scarred by dramatic mass shootings in recent years, including the Columbine school shooting in 1999, which left 15 people dead, and the 2012 shooting at a movie theater in Aurora that claimed 12 lives. Both are within a half-hour’s drive of Highlands Park.


Vote count begins for Afghan election

Afghan election observers at a polling center after ballots in the country’s legislative election were counted in Kabul on Monday. (AFP)
Updated 22 October 2018
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Vote count begins for Afghan election

  • Some candidates said powerful figures were behind election rigging
  • The Electoral Complaints Commission said there was mismanagement during the election, and as of Sunday it had received some 5,000 complaints from voters and candidates

KABUL: Vote counting began on Monday for Afghanistan’s parliamentary election, which was marred by violence and irregularities, with political parties alleging “organized fraud.”

The parties said mismanagement and hundreds of Taliban attacks, which led to an extension of voting for another day at hundreds of polling stations, could raise questions over the election result, which is expected to be released in two months.

Some candidates said powerful figures were behind election rigging, and biometric devices, which were put in place to counter fraud, were smashed to facilitate the rigging. 

Abdul Bade Sayad, head of the country’s Independent Election Commission (IEC), was cited by local media as confirming incidents of biometric equipment being smashed, and the presence of strongmen inside some polling stations. 

But the IEC should not be held responsible for this, he said, adding: “When the government itself feels helpless before powerful figures, then senior officials of the commission should not be blamed.”

The Electoral Complaints Commission said there was mismanagement during the election, and as of Sunday it had received some 5,000 complaints from voters and candidates.

Afghanistan’s Independent Human Rights Commission (IHRC) said people could not vote on Saturday in some 1,000 polling stations. 

Ahead of the election, which was delayed for more than three years, the government said it could not open more than 2,000 stations due to security threats.

Alleged irregularities included polling stations opening late, biometric devices malfunctioning, and the absence of IEC staff and voter registration lists.

Of the 9 million people who had registered to vote, nearly 4 million cast their ballot, the IEC said.

The IHRC said the IEC should not shun its responsibility regarding “shortcomings and grave violations in voting centers.”

The Transparent Election Foundation of Afghanistan said: “In some of the polling stations, ballots were not counted; instead the ballot boxes were transferred to a different location for counting… without informing the observers about the new location.”