Deputy killed, five wounded in ‘domestic’ shooting in Colorado

An investigator heads to the scene of shooting on Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017, in Highlands Ranch, Colo. Authorities in Colorado say one deputy has died and multiple others were wounded, along with two civilians, in a shooting that followed a domestic disturbance in suburban Denver. (AP)
Updated 31 December 2017
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Deputy killed, five wounded in ‘domestic’ shooting in Colorado

WASHINGTON: A sheriff’s deputy was killed and seven other people, including five deputies, were wounded Sunday in what police called a “domestic disturbance” in a residential suburb near Denver, Colorado.
The lone suspect was “shot & believed to be dead” after the standoff at the Copper Canyon apartment complex in Highlands Ranch, 12 miles (20 kilometers) south of Denver, the Douglas County sheriff’s office tweeted. Details of the incident were not immediately clear.
The wounded were taken to two area hospitals, at least three of them with noncritical injuries, the Denver Post reported.
Deputies had responded to an early-morning call of a disturbance when shots were fired from the building. Police quickly dispatched a heavily armed SWAT team as well as a bomb-squad truck, though there was no immediate word of any explosives being found.
Police from five jurisdictions, including Colorado state police, were placed on alert.
As the incident unfurled, the sheriff’s office advised local residents to take cover in place and stay away from windows.
The toll among deputies Sunday appeared to be one of the highest in a police-involved shooting since five officers in Dallas, Texas were shot to death and several others injured in July 2016 by a man angered by police shootings of black men.
The area near Sunday’s shooting has been scarred by dramatic mass shootings in recent years, including the Columbine school shooting in 1999, which left 15 people dead, and the 2012 shooting at a movie theater in Aurora that claimed 12 lives. Both are within a half-hour’s drive of Highlands Park.


Thai cave boys to leave hospital

Updated 45 min 39 sec ago
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Thai cave boys to leave hospital

  • The “Wild Boars” football team are being discharged a day earlier than announced
  • Doctors have advised families of the boys, aged 11 to 16, that they should avoid letting them have contact with journalists for at least one month after they are discharged

CHIANG RAI, Thailand: Twelve boys and their football coach rescued from a cave in Thailand will leave hospital Wednesday and speak to the media for the first time, a government spokesman said.
The “Wild Boars” football team are being discharged a day earlier than announced and authorities hope that by holding the question and answer session before they head home it will satisfy the huge interest in their story.
“The reason to hold this evening press conference is so media can ask them questions and after that they can go back to live their normal lives without media bothering them,” Thailand’s chief government spokesman Sunsern Kaewkumnerd said.
But with experts warning of possible long-term distress from the ordeal inside the Tham Luang cave in northern Thailand, this will be no ordinary briefing.
The public relations department in Chiang Rai province solicited questions from news outlets ahead of time and they will be forwarded to psychiatrists for screening.
Called “Sending the Wild Boars Home” and broadcast on major television channels, the session will last for about 45 minutes, Sunsern said, adding that it would be conducted in an informal style with a moderator.
“They are likely to return home immediately after the press conference,” he said.
Doctors have advised families of the boys, aged 11 to 16, that they should avoid letting them have contact with journalists for at least one month after they are discharged.
Though they and their coach are all said to be in good mental and physical health, health officials say that additional psychological monitoring will be provided to detect lingering trauma.
The daring Thai-led international effort to rescue the “Wild Boars” captivated the world after they walked into the cave on June 23 and were trapped by rising floodwaters.
After nine days without a steady supply of food or water they were found emaciated and huddled in a group on a muddy ledge by British divers several kilometers inside Tham Luang.
Rescuers debated on the best plan to bring them out but ultimately decided on a risky operation that involved diving them through waterlogged passages while they were sedated to keep them calm and carrying them out in military-grade stretchers.
Not even the foreign cave diving specialists who took part were sure the mission would work and many expressed relief when it was all over after the final five were rescued on July 10.